Recently in PDFs Category

Judge Tells Lawyer to Follow Guidelines and Start Preparing Better Documents

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn December 27, 2009In: PDFs, Resources

Email This Post | Print this Post

I continue to be amazed by some of the less-than-best writing practices of my friends and colleagues.  Many of these practices relate to the ways in which they format documents. I recognize that many of these practices derive only from habit--not bad intentions.  But that doesn't make them any less annoying.  And what makes them more annoying is the irrational devotion they garner. 

What are these habits, you ask?  Truth be told, there are too many to list here.  But there is good news--I am not alone.  There are others who feel strongly about the importance of documents done right. 

Minnesota bankrupcty court judge Robert Kressel is one such sympathizer.  Recently, he issued Order Preparation Guidelines for attorneys appearing before him.  The Guidelines spell out a variety of writing misdeeds that Judge Kressel wisely abhors. 

I have two thoughts about these Guidelines.  First, they offer terrific advice that everyone should follow.  Second, they demonstrate how helpful style guides can be and make me wish that there were more such guides in place--both in the judicial system and in the workplace.  

All of the guidelines are great, really.  But a few stand out for me.

The first guideline, for example, instructs parties to submit PDFs that have been converted directly from Word or WordPerfect--instead of by scanning printed paper copies.  Amen!  Why in the world anyone thinks it is somehow better to print a document and then hard scan that document to PDF positively escapes me.  Print to PDF, people.  Please, I beg you!  As Judge Kessler points out, it saves tremendously on the size of the PDF.  And it also provides a far better looking final document, as well as a searchable document.  A document that is printed to PDF (as opposed to scanned) can also accept comments made with commenting tools in Acrobat, such as highlighting and adding "sticky notes."  (See my previous posts on the topic of PDFs for better documents for additional inspiration).

Judge Kessler also reminds lawyers to "limit the use of capital letters to proper names."  I've discussed the "ALL-CAPS disease" before but it bears repeating.  For those of you who have held tight to this habit, please consider resolving to abandon it in the new year.  Words that are typed in all capital letters are very difficult to read.  For an excellent explanation of the phenomenon, see Robin Williams' highly instructive and enlightening book, The PC Is Not a Typewriter

There are other resources for those who are open minded and ready to make some positive changes to their document-formatting habits.  Ms. Williams' book is a fantastic place to start.  (The book is closer to a pamphlet than War and Peace and serves as an excellent desk reference.)  The Seventh Circuit has published an excellent and extensive set of guidelines for briefs (pdf).  One of the sources cited in the court's guidelines is Ruth Anne Robbins' journal article, Painting With Print (pdf), which is far more detailed and a truly outstanding scholarly work.  Finally, specific to the legal profession but applicable for all professions is Matthew Butterick's blog, Typography for Lawyers

So, wonderful readers, go forth into the new year with standards set high and paragraph alignment set to Left (please, no more justified paragraphs!).  These are resolutions that, if kept, truly would help make the world a better place, one document at a time.

[Hat tip to the Lawyerist]

 

 

Judges Order Re Writing Mistakes in Court Filings

 

Twitter_922110ea-eff6-419e-a90b-74240d84b8c6

 

Follow me on Twitter . . . @MollyDiBi

Deposition Exhibits: There Is a Better (Digital) Way

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn August 7, 2009In: PDFs, Tech Tips

Email This Post | Print this Post

Depositions are critical. Litigators know that an entire case can rise or fall because of testimony given by a deponent. The vital nature of depositions warrants a great deal of preparation in advance by the deposing attorney. In many cases, the documents shape the deposition questioning. It can require a great deal of attention to determine which documents will be used as exhibits.

Here's a quick picture of how my deposition exhibits used to be prepared. The potential exhibits are identified by the lawyer in advance and turned over to the paralegal. The paralegal then makes copies and prepares a separate file folder for each document. During the deposition, when ready to admit a particular document, the lawyer describes the document to the paralegal. The paralegal then begins to search through the bankers' box full of file folders. Once located, the copies are distributed around the table, one is marked by the court reporter, and the deposition continues.

I gave up that method because it seemed so disorganized and difficult. Plus, it required a paralegal spend quite a bit of time to get the documents ready, which meant that I had to know which ones I intended to use far in advance of the actual deposition. The system I currently use takes a fraction of the time to prepare, is far more organized, is easier to use during the deposition, and makes life much, much easier for me, for my paralegal, and for the court reporter.

Here's how it works.

First, I determine which documents I think I'll want to use. It's a low-commitment decision, though, as you'll see. I err on the side of more, rather than less, documents, so if I think I may want to use it, I add it to the "yes" pile.

Once I have a general sense of the documents I intend to use as exhibits, I group them into general categories, instead of admitting each document one at a time. Some documents may end up as a stand-alone exhibit. An employee handbook is an example of a document I'm more likely to move in as a single exhibit. But performance evaluations, for example, are documents I'm likely to group together, sorted chronologically, and call them just one exhibit. Once categorized, these groups of documents become my exhibits.

Of course, all of the documents are already scanned in and my review is usually on the computer instead of in paper, but if, for some reason, they're not yet in electronic form, they would get scanned in now. I assemble the exhibits (the groups of documents), pulling the pages or documents I want into a single PDF file--1 PDF for 1 exhibit.

Next, I add page numbers to the exhibits in Acrobat. To do this in Acrobat 9, just go to Document > Headers and Footers > Add. The Add Header and Footer dialog box opens.

clip_image002

 

Place your cursor in the box that matches where you want the page number to appear. If your documents are bates stamped on the bottom right, you may want to put the page number directly underneath that number or you may find it easier to put the page number in the middle of the page, keeping the two numbers separate.

So, let's say you want to put your page numbers in the middle of the footer area. Place your cursor in the box labeled Center Footer Text. (#1). Then choose the font type and size that you prefer. (#2-3). Click Insert Page Number. (#4).

I prefer to include the word "page" before the number, just so it's clear that the number is not otherwise part of the document. To do this, you could type the word page in the box in front of the page number but there is a better way. Click the link that says Page and date number format. (#5).

In the new window that appears, you'll see a drop-down menu of choices for how page numbers are formatted. Choose the one you prefer--in my case, I chose "Page 1" or "Page 1 of n"--and then click, Ok.

image

 

Back in the Header and Footer dialog box, there is one more option worth considering. Click the Appearance Options link. (#6). In the new window that appears, check the box next to Shrink document to avoid overwriting text and graphics. This ensures that your page number won't cover up the contents of the original document.

image

 

Ok, you're almost done. We're almost ready to add the page numbers. Instead of going through these steps for each exhibit, though, we're going to do all of them at once.

To add page numbers to more than one PDF at the same time, click the Apply to Multiple button in the bottom right corner of the dialog box. (#7). Then select Add Files from the drop-down button in the new window that opens and browse to your other exhibits to add them to the list. (To select more than one file at the same time, press the Ctrl key and choose as many documents as you need).

image

Once you have a list of all of your exhibits, click Ok.

The Output Options dialog box opens.

image

Here, you can decide how Acrobat should handle the newly numbered documents--whether they should be saved automatically, whether they should be saved with a name different than the original file, etc. This is just a matter of personal preference, so make your selections and click Ok.

Now all of your exhibits have page numbers, making the deposition much easier. You'll be able to say, "Please turn to page number 13 of Exhibit 2" and everyone can quickly and easily locate that page. This is especially important in my system because I'm grouping documents together, so the bates numbers do not run sequentially.

If you want to do it right, there's one more step to the process. Using the custom stamp created by guru Rick Borstein, you can add an exhibit stamp to each document with the name it would normally be given--in my case, the witness' name and the exhibit number, i.e., Smith 2.

image 

You can learn how to install and apply the custom exhibit stamp at Rick's wonderfully informative blog, Acrobat for Legal Professionals.

When all of the exhibits have a stamp and page numbers, I have them copied and inserted into binders with numbered tabs. At the beginning of the deposition, I give the witness, his counsel, and the court reporter a copy, and keep a copy for myself and for my paralegal. We use this binder throughout the deposition and don't have to stop for the tedious document search or to have the court reporter mark each exhibit. It's not only a tremendous time saver, but it allows me to concentrate on the questioning instead of file folders and gives me a guaranteed way to know that I'll cover all of the documents I need to cover.

Tweet Me! It's Friday, for cryin' out loud!

Posted by E-LawOn July 31, 2009In: Employee Engagement, PDFs, Social Media in the Workplace, Women, Wellness, & Work-Life Balance

Email This Post | Print this Post

Twitter continues to gain popularity and I've jumped on the bandwagon.  Here are my "tweets" from this week, grouped into rough categories by topic.

 

Social Media

Video HowCreate an Account in LinkedIn (via Professionally Speaking) http://bit.ly/R130x Now you've got no excuse to avoid #social #networking

Using Twitter as a teaching tool (via #elearning future) Twitter_logo.jpeg

RT @mashable High School Admins Coerce Cheerleader for Facebook Password http://bit.ly/1O2xWf (and then disclose the info on her pers. pg.)

RT @fyiscreening4 Tips On How To Use Social Networks For Employee Screening (from N.Y. Law Journal)  http://bit.ly/j3zcv

RT @Twitter_Tips Top 10 Rules of Twitter Etiquette: http://ow.ly/iekG --Share this guide: http://bit.ly/44Vft3

RT @LissaLawyer: AmLaw Daily asks whether the Future is "Oh So Social" http://bit.ly/LmVpV

RT @HRSocialMedia: White House using LinkedIn to get comments from small business on health care reform http://tinyurl.com/lcnexv

Canada's #privacy commissioner gives #Facebook a failing grade http://bit.ly/5VCoh (RT: @cybercourt)

RT @mashable Top 5 Funniest Fake Facebook Pages http://bit.ly/bkPDV. Slate's fake Obama #Facebook page is a riot

 

Legal

FTC has postponed (again) the start of its "Red-Flag Rule" until November due to ?s re: how to comply. http://bit.ly/drImZ

Thanks to @MelanieMcClure for mention of my "anti-harassment policy tip sheet" http://tinyurl.com/mhh5hn

RT @Eric_B_Meyer: Philly Inquirer article rips Sen. Specter for wavering on #EFCA.

In Philly, $10m #verdict in police officers' race-bias suit cut to $30k max per Title VII cap http://bit.ly/KJJoH

 

Presentations and Public Speaking

Delaware gets its own #Ignite night! (via The News Journal) YCST E-law did #Pecha Kucha back in April w/great response. http://bit.ly/OLi09

RT @pptninja: 31 Flavors of PowerPoint - Part I http://bit.ly/Dvdxb #ppt (Great post re: diff. presentation styles needed diff. settings

 

Work-Life Balance

WSJ's The Juggle talks about how we handle pressure differently at home vs. at work. Is there anyone who doesn't? http://bit.ly/xaNwW

RT @DrDavidBallardRT @jessicapeterson Employees financial problems cost employers $4.5 billion annually (BusinessWeek) http://bit.ly/TiM3b

 

The Paperless Office

RT @DisabilityTips 6 Myths of Going "Paperless" | Colorado Social Security Law http://bit.ly/nYAJV

Why are fed courts so opposed to #technology in the #courtroom? NY lawyers want the rules changed. Agreed. http://bit.ly/11WvzD

Great #acrobat article re: What You Can Accomplish With Adobe Acrobat Forms http://is.gd/1NqkM RT @acroboy: RT @wikiatech.

 

Management & Leadership

Here's a real shocker from @nytimes: Corner Office: No Doubts: Women Are Better Managers http://bit.ly/3eFOVv (via @wbowser)

Great book on management: Not Everyone Gets a Trophy by Bruce Telgan. Supposed to be re: Gen Y but is applicable to all http://bit.ly/EB3mj

RT @hrmagazine: PricewaterhouseCoopers offers program to develop 1st-yr college students. http://bit.ly/M9H7s Great idea for #GenY!

PDF Security: Sharing Your Work Product With the Public

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn July 5, 2009In: PDFs

Email This Post | Print this Post

You’ve got something to share. A newsletter, a brochure, a seminar handout. You’ve spent time making the document look its best. You converted it to PDF. Everyone can access your shiny new PDF and no one can steal your work product. Well, almost.

Unless your PDF is properly secured, its contents can be copied and pasted into a word-processing document, where your work can be manipulated or altered. Anyone with Adobe Acrobat and a little knowledge can reuse and repurpose the content, taking credit for your hard work.

But don’t worry. All is not lost. You can use Acrobat to secure your documents and protect your work product. The steps are listed in short form first, with a more detailed explanation below.

1. Open your PDF in Acrobat and select File, Properties from the menu toolbar. In the dialog box that opens, go to the Security tab.

2. From the Security Method drop-down box, choose Password Required. A new dialog box opens. There are several options in this dialog box but we only need one of them to accomplish our objective. (See Figure 1).

3. Under Permissions, check the box next to Restrict editing and printing of the document. Type a password in the Change Permissions Password box. (See Figure 2).

4. In the drop-down box for Printing Allowed, select High Resolution. If you select None, your readers won’t be able to print the PDF, which they likely would find particularly annoying. After all, the point of sharing your newsletter or other publication is for recipients to read it. Prevent printing and you defeat the purpose to a large degree.

5. In the drop-down box for Changes Allowed, select None. And make sure that the check box next to the Enable copying of text option is not checked.

Figure 1

clip_image002

Figure 2

image

Here’s a tip about password selection. Choose one easy-to-remember password that will be used for all documents created internally that you want to share with the public. The purpose of the password is to protect the contents of a quarterly newsletter. Although this is a perfectly legitimate goal, it doesn’t necessitate the same level of security as, let’s say, entrance to the NASA offices. Shoot for something that can be remembered and you’ll avoid the frustrating experience of being locked out of your own document.

Make sure that everyone who has any part in the creation or publication of these documents is given the password and knows that it is the only password that may be used. This includes your assistant, who may make any final changes to the document before converting it to PDF. It also includes the individuals responsible for posting these documents on your firm’s website. And it includes members of your marketing team who may send the documents to news and media sources. Everyone should know the password and should know to check the security of every document prior to releasing it the public.

She Shoots, She Scores! An Adobe PDF Tip for March Madness

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn March 26, 2009In: PDFs

Email This Post | Print this Post

Adobe Acrobat 9 holds iconic status in my office.  (See A Plea for PDF: How Adobe Acrobat Can Revolutionize Your Practice).   We love it. acrobat iconWe use it for "everything"--or so we think, until someone thinks of another way to put it to use.  There are so many unexpected ways to put the PDF to good use that we've started a list of them that's shared throughout the office.  One of my coworkers, Felicia B., came up with a way to put Acrobat 9 to good use during March Madness.  I thought it was pretty creative so I'm passing the tip along to readers.  

Felicia used the Typewriter tool in Acrobat to make her basketball picks this year.  Unlike the scribbled brackets of her family and friends, Felicia's brackets are neatly typed and ready for emailing--without a trip to the scanner. 

This tip isn't computer wizardry.  It's just a great example of thinking outside the box and putting software to work!  Thanks for the tip, Felicia!!

If you're thinking about taking your office "paperless" (or, as I prefer, "digital"), here are some resources:

The Link Between the Digital Office and Improved Intangibles

Preparing to Make the Switch to "Almost Paperless"

Making the Switch to Digital: Legal Research

Making the Switch to Digital: Legal Research

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn March 2, 2009In: PDFs, Resources

Email This Post | Print this Post

Lawyers still don't seem to appreciate the power of PDF.  I've posted some thoughts on the benefits of moving towards a digital office, using Adobe Acrobat.  Even if you aren't [yet] committed to making the switch to almost-paperless, there are ways that you can (and should) be implementing Acrobat and the PDF format into your everyday legal practice. 

I was reminded of this by Raymond P. Ward, at the (new) legal writer in his post, Owning Your Downloaded Legal Authorities.  Mr. Ward made my list of the Top 30 Writing Blogs and for good reason--his blog is a valuable resource for legal writers.  As highly as I regard Mr. Ward and his normally sage advice, I must disagree with him a little on the argument he made in his post.  But just a little.

Ward advises readers to take a few extra steps when conducting online research to save time and effort later.  Agreed.  Next, he advises that, when downloading a case from LexisNexis, Westlaw, or other online legal database, attorneys should save the case "in a word-processing format (Word or WordPerfect), not PDF." 

He explains that, by downloading the case before printing or saving it, you are able to reformat the document, cleaning it up for easier reading, and annotate the case for later reference.  All excellent ideas.  But these ideas can be better executed in Acrobat PDF, rather than Microsoft Word or WordPerfect. 

Here are some of the reasons Ward urges readers to save research in a word-processing format:

  1. If you find the case difficult to read, re-format it. Change the type face or enlarge the font size.
  2. Delete all the headnotes having nothing to do with why you downloaded the case, saving only the pertinent headnotes. This simple tip not only saves you the trouble of wading through dozens of useless headnotes; it also saves paper when you print a hard copy.
  3. While you’re at it, delete the lawyers’ names. Every little bit of clutter-elimination helps. And nobody will mind except the lawyers’ mothers.
  4. Use Word or WordPerfect to highlight the parts that are most important.
  5. Instead of writing in the margins of a hard copy, use Word or WordPerfect to insert comments. That way, your comments will be saved on your electronic copy.
  6. Edit the document header to add all information needed to cite the case. This will later save you the trouble of printing an entire 24-page case when you only need one page with one juicy quotation.

Each of these objectives can be accomplished in Acrobat with ease and, in many cases, with more functionality.   The most obvious way to accomplish any of the cited features is to save the document to Adobe PDF and then, if you later find you want to edit the document in MS Word, simply export the PDF to Word, an easy trick when using Acrobat 9.  But let's go through how you can accomplish Ward's suggestions without converting PDF to Word.

Continue reading "Making the Switch to Digital: Legal Research" »

Preparing to Make the Switch to "Almost Paperless"

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn February 13, 2009In: PDFs

Email This Post | Print this Post

There is an apparent misconception about the costs associated with converting to a digital office. Depending on the firm’s current operating system, the switch may cost nothing. That was the case for my transition--our firm had the resources already in place so the only change that was required was in the way I managed my documents.  The most common costs, when they do exist, are the costs associated with a purchase of additional or better quality scanners and the cost of additional software licenses. 

Of course, if the firm is starting from the very beginning, having made little or no previous investment in its technology infrastructure, substantially higher costs can be expected. Even then, the maximum investment involves expenditures in the form of an upgrade to the firm’s DMS, purchase of increased bandwith, or the acquisition of additional memory and electronic storage. Major investments, though, are the exception, not the rule. Blank Clipboard and pen

Does converting to digital require the conversion of archived files?

The expected cost and required processes involved in converting to a digital office will depend on whether the conversion is prospective only or whether there will be an effort to convert the firm’s archived files, as well. Obviously, the latter requires a great deal more organization, planning, and significantly more money.  Firms that are considering a total conversion should be aware of the expansive nature of this endeavor before making the commitment.  Realize, though, that there is no requirement to make the switch for all files all at once.  

It may be more realistic to consider a prospective-only conversion.  Not only will it be far easier to execute but also significantly easier to secure support for a more limited project. Wait until the firm has enjoyed the benefits of its new digital practice. After everyone has become comfortable with the process and has had the opportunity to develop trust in the system, then consider moving to the larger project of converting archived files.

Continue reading "Preparing to Make the Switch to "Almost Paperless"" »

The Link Between the Digital Office and Improved Intangibles

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn February 12, 2009In: Generations: Boomers, Xers, and Millennials, PDFs, Resources

Email This Post | Print this Post

I've posted about how Adobe Acrobat 9 can revolutionize your law practice by lowering operational costs and increased earnings.  And there's plenty more to be said on both fronts. But, in this post, I'll switch my focus from hard to soft costs; i.e., "intangibles."  There continues to be an increased focus on “intangibles” in the workplace—the costs that, although difficult to quantify, have a direct impact on profitability.  Employee engagement and satisfaction are intangibles that are linked directly to client satisfaction and retention, firm revenue, and firm profitability. 

Similarly, employee turn-over can have disastrous consequences for firms that ignore the value of employee morale. The cost of repltaking notesacing an employee is estimated to be 100% of the individual’s yearly salary for staff members, 150% for long-term employees and management, and as much 300% for junior associates when partner mentoring time is factored into the equation. Based on these numbers, a firm’s intangibles can have an enormous impact—positive or negative—on the bottom line. 

And how can the digital office contribute to firm intangibles? The digital office enables firm staff to become more efficient in day-to-day tasks. Increased efficiency means more time for other tasks and different types of work. When freed from menial duties, such as repetitive copying and filing, staff can be given more challenging and substantive assignments.

The benefits of this should be obvious—a challenged and stimulated workforce is a more engaged workforce. Engaged employees are more motivated and that motivation leads to increased productivity. The more successes an employee experiences, the more engaged he or she becomes, thereby further continuing the cycle of positive results.

Additionally, the digital office enables attorneys to take their practice with them anywhere, provided they have access to an available internet connection.  Eliminating the need for attorneys to be in the office just for the sake of being there, workers in the digital office find that "work-life balance" may not be as elusive as once thought.  The modern workforce has made it increasingly clear that flexible work schedules are at the top of the priority list.  And Gen Y workers, the most recent generation to flood the recruiting office, have their own set of demands; and flexibility is high on that list.

Are you convinced yet?  It's true.  Go ahead, start a digital revolution!

The Digital [Office] Revolution: Go Ahead, Make the Switch.

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn February 10, 2009In: PDFs

Email This Post | Print this Post

The paperless office may be a myth, at least according to authors Abigail J. Sellen and Richard H. R. Harper, who've earned Malcolm Gladwell's stamp of approval.  But an office with less paper is very much a reality.  So let's put our biases aside--from here out we'll refer not to a "paperless office" but, instead, to a "digital office."  For some background to this series, see yesterday's post, A Plea for PDF: How Adobe Acrobat Can Revolutionize Your Practice.  In this post, we'll talk about the potential cost savings that can result from switching to a digital office.  Tomorrow we'll touch on the other, less tangible benefits.  Later in the week, we'll get to the specifics about how you can go about implementing a revolution in your workplace.

What is involved with a digital office?

In the broadest sense, the phrase “digital office” means a business that operates with electronic, as opposed to paper, files. The “paperless office” was used initially but became less popular as it became less probable to actually occur. “Less paper” is more realistic and the goal of the digital office is not to never use paper. The goal of the digital office is to increase effectiveness while decreasing reliance on paper files.

In a more specific sense, a digital office is one in which all documents, records, and files are managed on the computer in electronic form instead of in filing cabinets in paper form. All documents, whether created internally or externally, are converted to an electronic file and kept in a document management system (DMS).paperless office empty records storage

How can a digital office lead to higher earnings?

Lawyers who have made the switch to digital experience any number of positive benefits. Perhaps the easiest of which to observe is the increased efficiency and time savings that result almost immediately. Time savings is a benefit enjoyed by staff, paraprofessionals, and attorneys alike.

By freeing staff and paraprofessionals from repetitive clerical work, they are able to turn their attentions to more advanced tasks. This enables attorneys to spend more time on client-specific work. In turn, the firm generates more revenue.

How can a digital office lead to lower operational costs?

In the long term, operational costs can be reduced significantly by converting to a digital office. Reduced paper consumption is, perhaps, a more obvious savings opportunity. But using less paper is just the start—think of all of the overhead costs required to organize, store, and dispose of that paper. From banker’s boxes to redwelds to file folders, the purchase of office supplies for storing and organizing paper files becomes unnecessary.

Photocopying costs are reduced dramatically. Documents can be accessed by any attorney in the firm, so the need to send a paper copy via interoffice mail is eliminated. When pleadings are received, the client can be sent a copy via e-mail instead of in paper format, in which case the savings extends beyond the copy cost to include the cost of an envelope and postage.

Another, more long-term, benefit of the digital office is reduced storage costs. In the digital office, closed files are not boxed up and shipped off-site for long-term storage. Instead, they are burned onto a CD or saved in another electronic format, which can then be tucked away in a binder in a filing cabinet and backed up on the firm’s server. If needed later, there is no need to call the Records Department and request the file be hauled back. Simply pull the needed documents from your desktop.

A Plea for PDF: How Adobe Acrobat Can Revolutionize Your Practice

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn February 9, 2009In: PDFs

Email This Post | Print this Post

It's true. Adobe Acrobat 9 is the best legal-technology product there is.  Law Technology News confirmed this conclusion at its annual awards last week at LegalTech when it selected Acrobat as the winner for "New Product of the Year."  (Second year in a row, by the way.) 

I am passionate about Acrobat.  No, really.  It has revolutionized the way I practice law and I am committed to communicating its benefits with others.  Just ask anyone in my department--they'll attest to my near-zealous devotion.  I've been totally digital since 2005.  (I prefer the term, "digital."  "Paperless" is a bit exaggerated.)  So I'm always surprised to hear others say that the conversion to digital is a pipe dream.  It's not hard, I promise. 

There are so many benefits and features of integrating PDF into your legal practice that I can't begin to address them all here.  Instead, I'm going to cover some of my favorites in a series of posts over the next several weeks.  To get you started, I'll leave you with this video, called Stop Stupid PDF Syndrome Now.  If you don't "get it" entirely, then you definitely should stay tuned for the upcoming posts in this series. 

From the video's creators:

Stop creating stupid PDF files for your printer. Preserve all the power of PDF by asking for Adobe's PDF Print Engine technology.

This is a great introduction to the value of using the "print to Adobe PDF" feature instead of scanning hard copies of your documents.