At our Annual Employment Law Seminar, we discussed the NLRB’s adoption of its so-called “quickie-election” rules, which were adopted in December 2011, following the Obama Administration’s failure to obtain passage of the “Employee Free Choice Act,” a statute designed to promote union organizing by providing for fast elections when a union files a petition for certification.

The new administrative rules are designed to speed the election process. While they are not as draconian as the proposed Employee Free Choice Act, they were intended to, and would have, cut the time from the filing of a petition to an election in half. So-called “quickie elections” favor unions because they limit the time an employer has to respond to union propaganda about the alleged benefit to employees from joining a union.

On Monday, May 14, 2012, a federal judge ruled in favor of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s request that the quickie elections rules be invalidated. Although a number of issues were raised in the case concerning the NLRB’s rule making power, the court ruled only on the question of whether a quorum was present when the Board adopted the rules.

Our Annual Employment Seminar has the topic of presentations on my mind this week. Like many of my employment-law colleagues, I do a lot of public speaking. I recently looked back at my speaking schedule for 2011 and was surprised to see that I averaged almost 1 speaking engagement per week. If it was up to me, I’d likely speak even more often but, again, my day job makes that difficult.

Being a good speaker is not easy–even for those of us who love it. It’s a craft and, like any craft, requires lots of practice and continued improvement. One guaranteed way to improve is to watch yourself–nothing shows flaws like a live video recording. A less traumatic way to improve is to watch other speakers. By paying attention to what they do well and what irks you can be a very effective training tool.

Here are two videos to get you started in your studies. The first is an updated version of Don McMillan’s Life After Death by PowerPoint:

Delaware is one step closer to legislating employers’ ability to manage their workforces. I testified yesterday about the significant flaws in H.B. 308, called the “Workplace Privacy Act.” The members of the Telecommunications, Internet, and Technology Committee nodded along, thanked me for my testimony, and then promptly voted to release the bill as is to the House of Representatives. This, my friends, is why I chose the legal profession over a career in politics.

As a result of the Committee’s decision, the bill will proceed to the House in its very defective state. I’ve posted at length about some of the many, many concerns I have about the unintended consequences this bill would have on employers and employees. But, after my experience at Legislative Hall, I have just one additional thought to share.

It seems increasingly clear that the intention of the bill’s sponsors is far more expansive than simply preventing employers from trying to get employees’ and applicants’ passwords. The intent, it seems to me, is to undo the entire body of case law that has been developed regarding privacy rights. In short, the sponsors are attempting to create a reasonable expectation of privacy in online activities and comments. This is directly opposite of what the law provides and would have tremendous implications on employers in every industry and of every size.

The NLRB, in response to a federal court decision issued on Monday, May 15, has suspended the implementation of the changes to its union-representation-election process.  The NLRB adopted the changes administratively in December of 2011. They took effect on April 30, 2012.  A federal court found the process used to adopt the rules to be invalid because the Board did not have a quorum when it voted on the rules.NLRB white_thumb

NLRB chairman, Mark Gaston Pearce, suspended implementation of the rules in response to the ruling. He said the NLRB is reviewing the Court decision but is “determined” to move forward with the rule changes.  In a related development, Acting General Counsel, Lafe Solomon, withdrew the guidance to regional offices that he had issued before the effective date of the new election procedures.  As a result, the Regional offices will follow the election process and practices prior to the revised rules until further notice.  Up to 150 election petitions are affected by this decision.

It’s only Wednesday but this has been a busy week already. If time allowed, I could write posts on several important employment-law-related topics. But, alas, my day job is keeping me busy, so this short-form recap of some of the more notable items will have to suffice.

Delaware’s Pending Password-Privacy Legislation

As I’ve written recently, there is a bill pending in Delaware’s House of Representatives that is intended to prohibit employers from requesting or requiring that an employee or applicant turn over his or her password. If you’ve read my posts on this topic, you know that I have significant concerns about the scope of the bill and its potential consequences for both employers and employees. This afternoon, the bill will be presented for vote to the Telecommunications, Internet, and Technology Committee.  I will keep you posted about the results of that hearing as soon as possible. Until then, you should consider reaching out to your State Representative and voice any concern you may have with the bill.

Reporter Sarah Tressler covered high society and fashion for the Houston Chronicle. She also worked as an exotic dancer on a part-time basis. According to Tressler, she worked as a stripper only “rarely” and did it for the “exercise” since she “didn’t have a gym membership.” So she must have been surprised when her “workouts” got her fired from her day job.

The Chronicle told her that she was being terminated for failing to disclose her side job on her employment application, according to MSNBC.

But Tressler ain’t buying it. She hired celebrity lawyer Gloria Allred, who has filed a charge of discrimination on Tressler’s behalf with the EEOC. The charge alleges that the termination constitutes gender discrimination.

Delaware’s version of a Facebook-privacy law, called the “Workplace Privacy Act” (H.B. 308), will go to hearing on Wednesday before the Telecommunications, Internet, and Technology Committee in Delaware’s House of Representatives. The bill, as amended, purports to prohibit employers from requesting or requiring an employee’s or applicant’s password to his or her social-networking site.

In actuality, the bill would fail to accomplish that single objective but would, at the same time, have implications far beyond the stated objective. I wrote in a more demure tone about some of my concerns regarding this bill. But, after seeing a video update (below) in which Rich Heffron of the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce reports that the bill is likely to pass before the close of the session on June 30, it seems that a more direct approach may be in order.

 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rftPf0hZ9E
 

Does Facebook cause smart people to act dumb? Stories of poor judgment via Facebook continue to make the news and continue to amaze me. But there seems to be no end in sight to the incidents of social-media stupidity. A recent story from Missouri may qualify for this category.

A high-school principal in Clayton, Missouri, is alleged to have created a fake Facebook account under the name “Suzy Harriston,” reports the NY Daily News. Before you know it, she had more than 300 friends–many of whom were students at the high-school. A former quarterback outed her, posting her real identity on his Facebook page. The Suzy Harriston account disappeared and, the next day, the school announced that the principal was taking a leave of absence.

The principal resigned following a closed-session meeting of the school board. The school board stated that the district and the principal had “a fundamental dispute concerning the appropriate use of social media.”

I had the pleasure of attending an event last week at which humorist Dave Barry was the keynote speaker. As you may be able to deduce from my lunatic-like grin, I am a big fan of Mr. Barry’s. I was very excited about hearing him speak and had been looking forward to the event for several months. I wasn’t disappointed. Dave Barry was hilarious. The audience was doubled over in their chairs with laughter for most of his talk.

DSC_0116.JPGAfter the event was over, I reflected on the lessons that could be excavated from his talk. What words of wisdom could be parsed from the humor and held like fragile gems of truth to be used later? If you’ve read Dave Barry’s work, either as a columnist for the Miami Herald or as the author of a few dozen books, you likely know the answer already. None.

That’s right. Dave Barry didn’t impart any words of wisdom or gems of truth. He didn’t lecture about the ways in which we could all work to improve the world. And he didn’t prosthelytize any political position. He just made us laugh. He told funny stories that were funny because they were true. And the stories made us laugh.

Legislation, both state and federal, prohibiting employers from requesting an employee’s or applicant’s password continues to make progress. In Particular, the pending bills in California and New Jersey passed to the next level of their respective legislatures yesterday. The first two federal bills of this type of failed but, fear not, a new version has been introduced. Gone is SNOPA; the Password Protection Act of 2012 was introduced earlier this week. In an effort to keep up, I’ve put together the list below, which includes a reference to each of the states with pending legislation of which I’m aware:

California

Bill: Social Media Privacy Act Date: May 10 Status: Unanimiously passed the State Assembly Applies to: Employers; Post-secondar educational institutions Other: Prohibition against “otherwise asking for access” to an account

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