I went to my second Bob Dylan concert tonight. Dylan, 71, put on a good show. A good show–but not a great show. By the end of the night, it seemed that most of the wind was out of his sails. I left the show asking myself, “How do you know when it’s time to quit?” I think this is a tough question for anyone who loves what they do and really hard for anyone who is great at what they do.

The same question could be asked about lawyers and judges. Six Pennsylvania judges have taken the question to the State’s supreme court, where they’ve filed a lawsuit alleging their constitutional rights are being violated by a provision in the State constitution that mandates the retirement of all state-court judges before they turn 71.

A similar provision in Missouri was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1990 but the PA judges hope that changes in the way the Court interprets the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause and what science says about the effects of aging. Currently, 33 states and the District of Columbia impose age restrictions on judges.

The discoverability of social-media evidence is far from a settled question. Many of the few cases that have addressed the question are employment claims. And the latest such decision is no exception. In EEOC v. Original Honeybaked Ham Company of Georgia, Inc., No. 11-02560-MSK_MEH (D. Col. Nov. 7, 2012), the Colorado District Court granted an employer’s motion to compel and required the employee-class members to turn over their log-in and passwords to a special master, who would make an initial determination of discoverability.

The EEOC filed suit on behalf of approximately 20 female employees, who, the EEOC alleged, had been subject to unlawful sexual harassment and retaliation by their former employer. The defendant-employer sought to compel the class members to produce unredacted versions of their social-media accounts.

The court first reminded the parties that it was determining what was discoverable–not what would be admissible at trial. The court next acknowledged that discovery of social-media information is a “thorny and novel” area of the law. Then the court reached its first substantive conclusion:

FLSA lawsuits based on missed meal breaks and automatic-deduction policies are one of many current trends in of wage-and-hour litigation. Meal-break claims brought by nurses and hospital staff are a particularly common scenario. But employers in the health-care sector need not give up hope, as there have been several recent opinions in favor of the employer in such cases. See FLSA Victory, Class Certification Denied. A recent decision by the 6th Circuit offers another positive example.

In White v. Baptist Memorial Health Care Corporation, (6th Cir. Nov. 6, 2012),the plaintiff, an ER nurse, did not have regularly scheduled meal breaks but was permitted to take them as the demands of her work allowed. The hospital had an automatic-deduction policy, whereby 30 minutes were deducted from time worked unless the employee submitted a time-exception form. The plaintiff in the case did not submit the form when she missed her meal break and did not complain that she was not being paid for that time.

After the district court awarded summary judgment to the employer, the employee appealed to the Sixth Circuit. The appellate court affirmed the decision, finding that the employee’s failure to comply with the hospital’s procedures by submitting the time-exception form precluded the hospital from knowing about the unreported time.

We deal with difficult people everywhere, really. At work, we may have to deal with difficult people as co-workers, as customers, as vendors, and as bosses, just to name a few.

Difficult people come in all shapes and sizes. The street bully is the difficult person who are yells and throws insults to get his or her way. The silent killer uses passive-aggressive tactics to wage wars based on sabotage. In today’s post, though, I have in mind the rough and rude bully type–the difficult person who pushes his or her way around like a bull in a china store and expects everyone to jump into action at his or her command.

The ABA Journal recently asked its readers how they deal with difficult people of a particularly difficult variety–opposing counsel in litigation. As a general rule, I have had very positive relationships with opposing counsel. In fact, many of my opposing counsel have become very good friends of mine, whose friendship I value tremendously. Particularly in Delaware, where we value civility and professionalism as a foundation of the practice of law, my interactions with the lawyer on the other side of the table is a positive one more often than not.

Workplace anti-harassment training can be summarized with the title of this post. The fact that an employee laughs at an inappropriate joke is not a legal defense to a later claim at harassment. Nor is an employee’s failure to object to inappropriate workplace conduct. One employer recently learned this lesson the hard way.

In the case of EEOC v. Holmes & Holmes Industrial, Inc., the EEOC filed suit against a construction company on behalf of several Black employees, alleging hostile work environment claims. To succeed in a case alleging discrimination based on a hostile work environment, a plaintiff must prove that he or she was subject to (1) intentional discrimination, that was (2) severe or pervasive (3) and subjectively offensive to the plaintiff, and (4) that would be objectively offensive to a reasonable person in the plaintiff’s position.

In support of its claims against Holmes & Holmes, EEOC asserts that the employee-claimants faced frequent, racially-charged comments from their managers and co-workers. EEOC also contended that supervisors frequently told racial jokes. In response, the employer argued that the employees engaged in similar conduct, frequently using racial slurs and terms.

New Jersey is the latest State to prohibit employers from requesting the passwords of employees and applicants. The N.J. Senate passed A2878 on October 25, 2012. The bill also prohibits employers from any kind of inquiry into whether the employee has an account on a social-networking site and from requiring that the employee or applicant grant the employer access to his or her social-networking account.

Although the Bill passed the Senate unopposed, the added exemption of law-enforcement agencies requires that the Bill be returned to the Assembly for approval before being sent to the Governor for approval, reports CBS New York.

Following Maryland, Illinois, and California, New Jersey is the fourth State in the country to pass a “Facebook-privacy” law applicable to employers.

Northern Delaware managed to escape Sandy largely unscathed, I feel very lucky to say. Our thoughts are with those who are still without power and, especially, with those whose homes were damaged by the storm. I am grateful to be able to return to work, though. In the spirit of maintaining normalcy, today’s post is not going to focus on hurricanes, floods, or other natural disasters. Just employment law. Stay safe, everyone.

No federal employment law expressly prohibits discrimination against an employee because of the employee’s involvement in domestic violence. For many employers, the idea of intentionally discriminating against a victim of domestic violence may be difficult to envision, even. I have seen this issue manifested in a few different contexts.

First, there’s the employee who is chronically absent from work as a result of domestic violence at home. In that case, the employer wants to know whether it is lawful to discipline the employee for her absenteeism, or whether it must permit her some type of leeway because the absences are not merely a result of the employee playing “hooky.” This question is particularly difficult when the employer’s attendance policy distinguishes between “excused” and “unexcused” absences.

Hurricane Sandy is heading right for Delaware; Gov. Markell announced a state of emergency earlier today. The hurricane is forecasted to be the second worst in recorded history. Our neighbors in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland are facing similarly treacherous weather conditions in the coming days. In light of the anticipated power outages, it’s likely that things on the blog will be quiet for the next few days.

sandy.jpgUntil then, here are some of our previous posts on emergency preparedness for employers:

State of Emergency: Liability for Employers During Inclement Weather

Is an employee who is in the country illegally a covered “employee” under the Workers’ Compensation laws? That was the question of first impression presented to the Delaware Superior Court in Del. Valley Field Servs. v. Ramirez, (PDF) No. 12A-01-007-JOH (Sep. 13, 2012). The court concluded that the answer is “yes,” and ordered that the former employee, who has since been deported to Honduras, is eligible to receive benefits under Delaware’s workers-compensation statute.

Facts

The employee, Saul Melgar Ramirez, was hired in April 2010 as an “independent contractor'”–which the term the court uses to say that Ramirez was paid in cash. In January 2011, he was converted to a regular employee and added to the payroll. When told by his boss that he would need a Social Security number for his I-9 documentation, Ramirez bought a fake SSN card for $180. In February, the payroll service informed the employer that the number was false. Ramirez was deported in March.

Under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), an individual who wrongfully accesses information stored on a computer can be held civilly and/or criminally liable. Employers have attempted to use the CFAA to prosecute employees who steal the company’s confidential information. Different jurisdictions have come down differently on the question of whether the CFAA can be used in the employment context.

What many employers do not know, though, is that almost every State, including Delaware, has a statute similar to the federal CFAA. And some such laws, including Delaware’s, have provisions with even more severe penalties than their federal counterpart. Here’s an unusual example of a State statute similar to the CFAA applied in the employment context.

State ex rel Oklahoma Bar Ass’n v. Olmstead, is a case of lawyer discipline. The lawyer was an elected judge in Harper County, Oklahoma, when he downloaded a “tremendous” volume of adult pornography on his State-issued computer. When the conduct was discovered, the judge resigned and was charged with 19 felony counts under Oklahoma’s Computer Crimes Act, which would have required a prison sentence of between 30 days and 10 years for each count. The lawyer pleaded no contest to a single violation of the statute and was given a one-year deferred sentence.

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