Articles Posted in Social Media in the Workplace

At our Annual Employment Law Seminar last week, I spoke about the “Facebook Privacy” bill that was then pending in Delaware’s House of Representatives.  The bill passed the House on later that day and is now headed to the Senate.  For those of you who weren’t in attendance last week, here’s a brief recap of the proposed law. 

The stated purpose of HB 109 is to protect individuals’ privacy in their personal social media accounts.  Generally speaking, HB 109 would prohibit employers from requiring or requesting that an employee or applicant give the employer access to their personal social-media accounts-either by giving up their passwords or by logging in and letting the employer take a look (also known as “shoulder surfing”). 

As we all know, though, with any law, the devil is in the details.  And there are, not surprisingly, a few devilish details.  For example. . .

A party’s “right to privacy” in the context of social media is the subject for numerous motions in civil litigation.  The scenario goes like this:  Plaintiff sues defendant, alleging injuries.  Defendants seeks discovery of Plaintiff’s social-media content, such as photos, posts, and comments, in the hopes of disproving liability and/or damages.  Plaintiff claims right to privacy in social-media content.  Court must decide.logo_from_dev

Because these cases are so fact specific, it can be difficult to extract a single principle or set of guidelines from their holdings.  But a recent case from an appellate court in Florida is a terrific example of the basic balancing act.

In Nucci v. Target Corp., the plaintiff claimed to have suffered physical injuries while shopping at a Target store.  Target sought to discover photographs of the plaintiff from her Facebook account going back two years before the incident through the present.  Target claimed that the photos would go to the quality of the plaintiff’s life before and after the accident to determine the extent of her loss.

Earlier this week, I wrote about the issue of threats made via Facebook constitute constitutionally protected speech.  Today’s post also is about threats made via Facebook but in the context of the workplace.  The case, decided by the Court of Appeals of Ohio, is timed perfectly for my road trip tomorrow to Ohio. social media letterpress_3

In Ames v. Ohio Department of Rehabilitation & Correction, an employee, a Senior Parole Officer, was sent for an independent medical exam after she posted a Facebook comment that her employer believed to be a threat.  The comment was in reference to shooting parolees.  The employee claimed that the comment was a joke.  The psychologist who conducted the exam cleared her to return to work, finding no evidence of depression, anxiety, or mood disturbance.

A few months later, the employer received an “anonymous” complaint that the employee was using her state-issued computer for non-work purposes.  It turned out that the complaint actually was made by the new partner of the employee’s ex-girlfriend.  The new partner, of course, was a co-worker. There was an investigation and the employee was issued a written reprimand.

The intersection of Facebook use and Free Speech is complicated.  Complicated enough, in fact, that the U.S. Supreme Court will weigh in on the subject when it decides a case it is scheduled to hear argument in today, Elonis v. United States. text message speech bubble or twitter keyboard_3

The basic legal principle at issue is what constitutes a “true threat.”  It is a crime to use the phone or Internet to make a “threat to injure” another person.  And “true threats” are not protected as speech under the First Amendment.  So, “true threats” to injure another made via Facebook can be punishable as crimes.  Otherwise, the speech would be protected by the constitution and could not be considered criminal.

But what’s a “true threat?”  Is that question to be answered by the “reasonable person” who would be subject to the threat?  Or does the speaker have to have intended his words as a threat to constitute a criminal act?

Employers, do you know what apps your employees are using?  That’s the question posed by a recent article in the WSJ.  (See Companies Don’t Know What Apps Their Employees Are Using).  My guess is that the answer to this important question is, “No.”  Here are my top tips for how not to be the employer discussed in the WSJ article. cloud storage file cabinet drawer and folders_3

First, have a policy about employees’ use of cloud-based apps to save work-related documents.  Consider prohibiting employees from saving work documents to cloud-based storage accounts such as Dropbox, SkyDrive, and  Also consider prohibiting employees from backing up the contents of their work laptops to cloud-based back-up accounts, such as Mozy and Carbonite.

Second, communicate your policy to all affected employees.  If employees don’t know about the prohibitions, your policy is unlikely to have the desired deterrent factor.  This means that your policy needs to be written in plain English and that it should be publicized to employees in a way that will actually be heard.

Employers face a serious challenge when trying to prevent employees from taking confidential and proprietary information with them when they leave to join a new employer-particularly when the new employer is a competitor.   When an employer becomes suspicious about an ex-employee’s activities prior to his or her last day of work, there are a limited number of safe avenues for the employer to pursue. privacy policy with green folder_thumb

Generally, an employer should not review the employee’s personal emails or text messages if they were sent or received outside the employer’s network.  But what if the employee turns over his personal emails or text messages without realizing it?  The answer is, as always, “it depends.”  A recent case from a federal court in California addresses the issue in a limited context.

After the employee resigned, the employer sued him for misappropriating trade secrets.  He filed counterclaims, accusing the employer of violating the federal Wiretap Act, the Stored Communications Act (SCA), and state privacy laws.  The employee alleged that the employer had reviewed his text personal text messages on the iPhone issued to him by the former employer after he’d returned it but before he unlinked his Apple account from the phone.

Employees telling secrets online was the subject of yesterday’s post, Keeping Secrets on Social Media.  Today’s post–a continuation of the theme from yesterday–is about “auto-expire” apps.

telling secrets_thumb
An “auto-expire” app is an app that enables users to set an automatic expiration date and time for social-media or other online content.  There are lots of reasons one would use an auto-expire app but the three that come immediately to mind are regret, efficiency, and secrecy.

Social-media regret is nothing new.  Just last summer, I wrote a post about social-media regret syndrome.  Auto-expire apps like Xpire, for example, allow users to set expiring posts for Facebook, Twitter, and Tumbler.

The title of this post is a bit laughable, isn’t it?  I mean, really, it’s almost an oxymoron.  Keeping secrets on social media?  What’s the point?  The very existence of social media is dependent upon sharing-not secret-keeping.  But the two are intersecting more and more.  Which is why I am writing a short series of posts about the topic.  Beginning today with a post about “anonymous” apps.telling secrets_thumb

Back in February, fellow employment lawyers, Adam S. Forman and Dan Schwartz, and I were interviewed for an article in Law360, titled, “What Employers Need to Know About the New Social Media.”  In that article, I discussed what I think is the wave of the future in social media for employers-apps focused on secrecy.

For example, one app, Secret, allows users to share anonymous messages with anyon3e in their contacts who also uses the app.  Employers in the tech industry, where these apps are particularly popular, are struggling with how to deal with (and, preferably, prevent), the loss of confidential company information.

Electronic discovery, the collection and production of electronic documents in litigation, is a scary thing to many lawyers. Some are so scared by it, in fact, that they just deny that it exists and continue to produce only hard-copy documents. Of course, that is a terrible idea. And not at all in compliance with the rules of procedure. But, alas, it is what it is.logo_from_dev

There are times that a lawyer will want to produce electronic records, such as text messages, emails, and, heaven forbid, social-media content, but simply not know how to do it.  I had an opposing counsel call me once and say that he was willing to produce his client’s relevant Facebook posts if I would show him how to do it.  Ummmm, no.

My point, though, is that lawyers are ethically bound to understand and comply with the applicable e-discovery rules but, as a matter of practical reality, that does not mean that they comply.  Which is why e-discovery continues to be a predominant subject for discussion in the legal profession.

Breaches of confidentiality via Facebook and other social media are more common than most of us would like to think.  Employees post information about customers, clients, and patients on Facebook, in violation of internal company policies and privacy laws, such as HIPAA, for example.  I recently wrote about a plaintiff who could not collect a sizeable settlement payment because his daughter posted about the settlement on Facebook, which served to demonstrate that her father had breached the confidentiality provision in the settlement agreement. logo_from_dev

There’s another reason to be concerned about what employees say on social-networking sites-waiver of the attorney-client privilege.  The general rule is that confidential communications between an attorney and her client are subject to the privilege and are not subject to discovery by the opposing side.  Privilege can be waived, however.  And one way for a client to waive privilege is to have the communication in the presence of a third party.  Another way is for the client to tell a third party about the communication between himself and his lawyer.

For example, Lawyer and Client meet to discuss strategy regarding litigation.  This conversation would be privileged.  If Client brings his friend to the meeting, the conversation would not be privileged.  And, if Client did not bring his friend but reported the conversation to his friend after the meeting was over, the privilege would be lost.

Contact Information