Articles Posted in Legislative Update

A bill pending in the Delaware legislature would expand the state’s anti-discrimination statute.  House Bill 4 would prohibit discrimination on the basis of domestic violence, sexual offense, or stalking.  If passed, the bill would have important implications for Delaware employers.  Here’s what you need to know.

Which Employees Would Be Protected?

If adopted, the bill would prohibit employers from discriminating against employees because the employee was a victim of domestic violence.  There are several scenarios where the implications of the law would be significant.

For example, assume an employee’s spouse is believed to be violent. The spouse comes to the workplace every day and sits in his car in the parking lot as a way to harass the employee.  The employee refuses to report the spouse to law enforcement out of fear of the repercussions.  The employer has a legitimate reason to be concerned.  Not only is the spouse’s conduct disruptive to the workplace but it also gives rise to a potential incident of violence at the workplace.

If the employee continues to refuse to report the conduct, can the employer terminate the employee?  Under the current law, yes.  Under the proposed law, no.  the proposed law prohibits an employer from taking adverse action against an employee because of domestic violence or stalking, both of which may be triggered under these facts.

Another possible scenario could involve co-workers in a domestic relationship.  Assume the relationship goes south and both employees file for a protective order, each alleging domestic violence.  Each has a therapist prepare a statement that he or she is the victim. 

Can you terminate one of the two under the proposed law?  No.  Can you terminate both?  Also, no.  Must you permit both of them to continue to work in the same location, causing a seemingly volatile situation?  Likely so.

What Are Employers Required to Do?

In addition to not discriminating, Delaware employers also would be required to make “reasonable accommodations” to an employee who is the victim of domestic violence, sexual offense, or stalking.  Specifically, employers would be required to accommodate the employee’s “known limitations” related to the offense.

For example, an employer would be required to permit the employee to make use of any accrued leave in order to avoid the spouse in the parking lot.  Or, perhaps, an employer could be required to permit the employee to use a different entrance and exit so to avoid being seen by the spouse.  The scope of required accommodations is unclear, as the term is not defined in the statute but, as with disabilities-based accommodations, would likely be expansive.

How Should Employers Prepare?

If the law is passed, employers could be faced with challenging facts.  Until then, employers may want to consider reviewing the following policies:

Violence in the Workplace.  Be sure your policy contains safeguards to ensure preparedness and that your employees know how to respond in an emergency.

Anti-Fraternization.  Consider whether you should impose restrictions on romantic relationships among employees.

Harassment.  As with other types of harassment, employees should be informed of the appropriate channels of communication when they or their coworkers are being subject to unlawful harassment.

At our Annual Employment Law Seminar last week, I spoke about the “Facebook Privacy” bill that was then pending in Delaware’s House of Representatives.  The bill passed the House on later that day and is now headed to the Senate.  For those of you who weren’t in attendance last week, here’s a brief recap of the proposed law. 

The stated purpose of HB 109 is to protect individuals’ privacy in their personal social media accounts.  Generally speaking, HB 109 would prohibit employers from requiring or requesting that an employee or applicant give the employer access to their personal social-media accounts-either by giving up their passwords or by logging in and letting the employer take a look (also known as “shoulder surfing”). 

As we all know, though, with any law, the devil is in the details.  And there are, not surprisingly, a few devilish details.  For example. . .

HB 109 prohibits an employer from asking an employee (or applicant) from disclosing “a username . . . for the purpose of enabling the employer to access personal social media.”  As written, that would mean that an employer could not ask a candidate what his or her Twitter handle is.  Twitter is, generally speaking, a publicly available site. 

So an applicant could have a public Twitter account, where he tweets racist or sexist speech or talks about how he likes to steal money from his current employer, but the employer wouldn’t be able to ask about it?  Huh?  I supposed we’d just have to wait till discovery in a lawsuit before we could ask for that (public information)?  Not my favorite part of this law.

There are other confusing parts of HB 109 that I think likely are unintended consequences of the legislation.  But, with 38 votes in favor and none against, it appears that the unintended consequences are well on their way to becoming law.  We’ll see what the Senate has to say about it and will be sure to keep you updated.  In the meantime, you can track HB 109 here.

Delaware Gov. Jack Markell signed into law legislation that expands the protections provided to employee-whistleblowers.  H.B. 300 extends whistleblower protections to employees who report noncompliance with the State’s campaign-contribution laws,who participate in an investigation or hearing regarding an alleged violation of the campaign-contribution laws, or who refuses to violate the campaign-contribution laws. Whistleblower

The practical effect of this new protection is limited, as it applies to a fairly narrow group of employees-those whose employer has some involvement in political fundraising.  But it serves as an excellent reminder about the importance of preventing unlawful retaliation.

Retaliation claims continue to top the list of claims filed with the EEOC.  Not only are they popular but they are some of the most successful for plaintiffs.  The reason for its popularity and its success is the same-retaliation happens.

Thankfully, most of us are not targets of workplace discrimination based on our race, gender, or disability.  But I’d challenge anyone to say that they’ve really never been the target of retaliation.  If you made a critical comment about a co-worker in front of your boss, you were probably subject to retaliation by that co-worker.  The retaliation could have been mild-maybe you don’t get invited to lunch that day.  It could be more overt-maybe a flat-out refusal to help the next time you request assistance from the co-worker.  Or it could be more covert-the coworker quietly (but intentionally) sows the seeds of poor performance with your boss, telling your boss every time you don’t make a meeting on time or leave early on a Friday. 

All of these things constitute retaliation.  But they’re not unlawful retaliation because they are not in response to you having engaged in a protected activity, such as reporting workplace discrimination or, now, refusing to violate the campaign-contribution law. 

So, how can employers prevent unlawful retaliation?  The key, in my opinion, is taking a step back.  We’ve all had our feelings hurt when a co-worker points out an error in our work while the boss is standing there.  But, the key is to take a step back, realize that you’re a rational, logical, thinking adult.  And move on.  No grudge holding.  It makes life far more difficult than necessary. 

See also

U.S.S.C. Clarifies the Applicable Standard for Retaliation Claims

Manager’s Drunk Facebook Post Leads to Retaliation Claim

3d Cir. Issues a Bitchin’ Constructive Discharge Decision

Business Is Booming . . . for the EEOC, Anyway

Delaware’s General Assembly has passed a law “relating to the removal of insensitive and offensive language.”  When I first saw the title of this Act, I admit, I was alarmed that our State’s legislature was banning profanity in some context.  I was relieved to read the text of the law, though, and learn exactly what it actually does provide.  People First Lanuauge

According to the synopsis, the bill is part of a national movement, known as People First Language (“PFL”) legislation, intended to “promote dignity and inclusion for people with disabilities.”  PFL requires that, when describing an individual, the person come first, and the description of the person come second. 

For example, when using PFL, terms such as “the disabled” would be phrased, “persons with disabilities.”  This language emphasizes that individuals are people first and that their disabilities are secondary.  I think this is an outstanding initiative.

First, it is far easier to do (or say) the right thing when we know what the right thing is.  So legislation like this, which makes clear what is (and is not) the right thing to say, is always helpful.  Second, I think the approach is spot on.  Individuals are people first. The same concept applies to all protected characteristics. 

I have received countless calls from clients seeking advice with regard to a potential termination of an employee.  The call often starts out like this: “We have an employee who is in a protected class and who is always late to work and who constantly undermines her coworkers.”

If the PFL concept were applied, the call would start out, instead, like this: “We have an employee who is always late to work and who constantly undermines her coworkers.” 

What matters is what the employee is doing (or failing to do) with respect to her job-not that she is “in a protected class.”  Start off by addressing what actually matters.  Everything else, including a discussion about potential accommodations, etc., will follow if and when it’s appropriate. 

See also, previous posts regarding Disabilities in the Workplace.

Criminal histories and credit scores will soon be an off-limit topic for job applications in Delaware’s public sector.  HB 167 passed the Delaware Senate on May 1, 2014, and is expected to be signed into law by Gov. Markell soon.  Criminal Background Checks

As we previously reported, the bill would prohibit public employers and contractors with State agencies from:

inquiring into or considering the criminal record, criminal history, or credit history or score of an applicant before it makes a conditional offer to the applicant.

Once a conditional offer of employment has been made, the employer may perform a background check but, even then, 

may only consider felonies for 10 years from the completion of the sentence, and misdemeanors for 5 years from the completion of the sentence.

The bill would also require employers to “several enumerated factors” (i.e., the EEOC’s factors) when deciding whether to revoke a conditional offer based on the results of a background check.

The scope of the bill is broader than you may suspect.  It would apply not only to public employers (i.e., State government), but also to “contractors with State agencies.”  It does, however, provide for an exception for contractors who are subject to conflicting State or federal laws.  For example, a child-care facility that contracts with the State would not be subject to the new law because it is obligated by other State laws to comply with certain background-screening requirements. 

The trend towards prohibiting employers from inquiring into an applicant’s criminal history or credit score does not appear to be going away any time soon.  Although, for now, only public employers in Delaware will be subject to this ban-the-box law, it may be just a matter of time before the scope is expanded to include private-sector employers, as well. 

See also

Bill Would Limit Use of Criminal Histories for Delaware Employers

Wilmington Joins the Ban-the-Box Bandwagon

Other posts on criminal-history checks for potential employees

Employment legislation has been a popular topic for the Delaware General Assembly in recent months. Here are two recently proposed legislation that Delaware employers should keep an eye on.

Employment Protection for the Disabled

The General Assembly has proposed a very simple change to the Delaware Persons with Disabilities Employment Protections Act (DPDEPA), which would change the definition of “employer.” More specifically, they have proposed decreasing the threshold for coverage from 15 employees (the same as the Americans with Disabilities Act) to 4 employees (the same as the Delaware Discrimination in Employment Act).

Expanding statutory coverage is always worrisome for employers. However, the proposed change would also provide consistency under Delaware law, which could benefit employers in their decision-making processes. Whatever your business’s philosophy, for that small subsection of businesses employing between 4 and 14 individuals, this is something to watch.

The Minimum Wage . . . Again

As many readers know, Delaware will increase its minimum wage–in two waves–resulting in a July 1, 2015 wage of $8.25. Since that legislation was signed by Governor Markell, the General Assembly has drafted another bill that would raise the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour. If passed in its current state, the bill would add a third step to the increases already legislated, requiring a jump from $8.25 to $10.10, effective June 1, 2016.

The proposed increase would put Delaware’s minimum wage far above the current federal requirement, and nearly in line with San Francisco, California, which has the highest minimum wage in the country ($10.74 per hour, effective January 1, 2014). The change mirrors legislation that President Obama is expected to propose, and which will face stiff opposition from Republicans in Congress. With that in mind, it is unclear whether Delaware’s proposed legislation has any chance of passing the General Assembly. But it is certainly an issue that employers should be monitoring.

Bottom Line

Keep in mind that these bills reflect proposed legislation, only. If you believe that your business would be adversely affected, reach out to the General Assembly, or bring these issues to the attention of any advocacy groups to which you belong.

So-called “ban-the-box” initiatives, which limit employers’ inquiries into an applicant’s criminal history, have been adopted by several cities and municipalities.  Philadelphia adopted such a law in the Spring of 2011.  The City of Wilmington joined the ban-the-box bandwagon in Fall 2012, when then-Mayor Baker signed an executive order that removed a question about criminal convictions from job applications.  But that executive order applied only to applicants seeking work with the City of Wilmington.  Other Delaware employers have not been subject to these restrictions.

A bill is pending in the Delaware legislature, though, would change that and more if passed.

H.B. 167 proposes to limit when public employers and government contractors may inquire about or consider the criminal background or credit history.   The employer would not be permitted to ask about this information until “after it has determined that the applicant is otherwise qualified and has conditionally offered the applicant the position.”  Thus, a covered employer would be prohibited from asking about criminal or credit history until at least the first interview-no more checkboxes on job application.

The bill also proposes to limit the specific types of information that can be requested. Covered employers would be permitted to ask only about: (a) felony convictions in the past 10 years; and (b) misdemeanor convictions in the past 5 years.

This means that questions about arrests would be totally off limits-both on applications and in in-person interviews.

Finally, the bill proposes to limit how the information that the employer obtains will impact the hiring decision.  The bill basically adopts a scaled-down version of the EEOC’s multi-factor analysis whereby employers would be required to consider the nature of the crime and its relationship to the position sought, how much time has passed, etc. 

Oddly, the bill offers no specific limits on the use of credit history information other than timing.  In other words, the bill prohibits covered employers from obtaining a credit report for the candidate until a conditional offer has been made.

Even for private-sector employers who do no business with the State or any State agency, the use of background checks as part of the screening process continues to warrant consideration.  Particularly since the laws around the country are still developing, employers should weigh the benefits of this checks against the risks.  (See 5 Reasons Why Criminal Background Checks Are a Perfect Storm for a Lawsuit).  And, if nothing else, employers should evaluate the process and policies in place for conducting such checks.

Editor’s Note:  This post was written by Timothy J. Snyder, Esq.  Tim is the Chair of Young Conaway’s Tax, Trusts and Estates, and Employee Benefits Sections. 

Delaware’s Mini-COBRA law, enacted in May 2012, allows qualified individuals who work for employers with fewer than 20 employees to continue their coverage at their own cost, for up to 9 months after termination of coverage.  When it was passed, the legislature provided that the provisions of the Mini-COBRA statute:

shall have no force or effect if the Health Care bill passed by Congress and signed by the President of the United States of America in 2010 is declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States of America or the provisions addressed by this Act are preempted by federal law on January 1, 2014, whichever first occurs.health carerationale for doing so as follows:

The Mini-COBRA Bill was originally passed as a short-term bill that was needed until the provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”) became applicable to states, which was to occur on January 1, 2014. However, because PPACA’s legislation relating to small employer group health policies now permits insurance companies to impose a ninety (90) day waiting period prior to the effective date of coverage, which was not anticipated when the Mini-COBRA Bill was passed, it is desirable to remove the sunset provision of the Mini-COBRA Bill so that the Mini-COBRA Bill remains in the Delaware Code, at least until a point in time when PPACA or other law may no longer permit an insurance company to impose waiting periods.

I initially thought that the Legislature provided for a January 1, 2014 sunset date because that is the date that coverage begins under the healthcare exchanges, which do not impose waiting periods in the typical COBRA scenario.  Thus, an individual terminated from a small employer could purchase his or her coverage for at least the 90-day waiting period from the exchange rather than requiring the former employer’s insurer to provide the mini-COBRA benefit.  In fact, the U.S. Department of Labor, which oversees regular COBRA benefit administration, has issued revised model COBRA Notices that inform the qualified beneficiaries that they can acquire COBRA coverage through their former employer or they can obtain new coverage from the healthcare exchange.

Delaware extended employment rights to volunteer firefighters and other first responders who must miss work due to emergencies or injuries sustained while providing volunteer rescue services.

Volunteer Emergency Responders Job Protection Act

Governor Markell signed two new bills affecting the employment rights of Delaware’s emergency responders. Under the Volunteer Emergency Responders Job Protection Act, employers with 10 or more employees are prohibited from terminating, demoting, or taking other disciplinary action against a volunteer emergency responder because of an absence related to a state of emergency or because of an injury sustained in the course of his or her duties as a volunteer emergency responder.

The Act defines a “volunteer emergency responder” as a volunteer firefighter, a member of the ladies auxiliary of a volunteer fire company, volunteer emergency medical technician, or a volunteer fire police officer.

Importantly, while an employer may not discipline or terminate an employee for being absent when performing emergency services, the employer is not required to compensate the employee for time away from work to perform such services. The employee also has an obligation to make “reasonable efforts” to notify the employer of a possible absence.

Under the Act, employers are also entitled to verify that an employee was absent due to emergency service or a related injury. Employers may request a written statement confirming relevant facts from either the volunteer department with which the employee serves or from a treating medical provider. The employer is entitled to the statement within 7 days of making such a request.

Amendment to the Delaware Discrimination in Employment Act

The second bill signed into effect amends the Delaware Discrimination in Employment Act, to provide protection to volunteer firefighters, ambulance personnel, and ladies auxiliary members. More specifically, the bill makes it unlawful for employers to refuse to hire, discharge, or otherwise discrimination as to the terms and conditions of employment based on an individual’s service rendered to a volunteer fire or ambulance company or related ladies’ auxiliary.

Bottom Line

The bottom line is that Delaware employers have one more protected classification to be aware of. Hopefully these new restrictions will not impose a significant burden upon employers–comments made in connection with the bill signing indicate that the bills are a reaction to a single incident affecting an injured firefighter working in Wilmington. However, as always, employers need to give careful consideration to the circumstances impacting hiring and disciplinary decisions.

Last week was a busy one at the Governor’s office, where Governor Jerry Brown signed into law no less than three new laws with a pro-labor, pro-employee theme. The first two laws were a package deal, making California is the first State to enact legislation that prohibits employers and educators from requesting employees’ and students’ social-networking passwords. Gov. Brown announced that he’d signed the twin bills into law via a Twitter post on Thursday.
Seal of California.png

California is the second State after Delaware to prohibit universities and colleges from requiring students to turn over their passwords to their social-networking accounts. It is the third State, following Maryland and Illinois, to enact similar legislation providing these privacy protections to employees and applicants. And similar legislation is pending in several States. New Jersey’s version of the Facebook-privacy law was released by a Senate committee at the end of September.

The day after Gov. Brown signed the bills into law, he signed a third bill, which declared May to be Labor History Month. What, you ask, does this actually mean? Well, it means that school districts in the State will commemorate the month with educational exercises intended to teach students about the role of the labor movement in California and across the country.

The bill extends Labor History Week into a full month and moves the observation from the first week of April to the month of May. According to the Sacramento Bee, many of California’s school districts are on spring break the first week of April, and supporters of the bill said the rest of the month is busy for students because they are preparing for statewide tests.

I think it’s safe to say that last week was a good week for the pro-labor movement in California.

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