Articles Posted in Seminars

The wait is over!  Registration is now open for YCST’s Annual Employment Law Seminar.  This year’s seminar will be held on May 8, 2014, at the Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington.   Check out the registration brochure for specific topics, speakers, and schedule.  We hope to see you there!

YCST Emloyment Law Seminar 2014_1

Back by popular demand!  Our FMLA Master Class, presented in conjunction with BLR and HR Hero, is always the most requested seminar from clients and seminar participants.  So, at your request, we’ve brought it back. 

If your organization is subject to the Family Medical Leave Act or if you are nearing 50 employees, you should consider joining us on February 12, 2014, for this in-depth, full-day program. 

You can learn more about the program and register online.  We’ll look forward to seeing you then!

The U.S. Supreme Court has issued a number of significant opinions over the past few months that address employment laws and practices, including harassment, retaliation, arbitration, and collective action wage claims. The impact of these decisions will be both immediate and far reaching. I am pleased to be participating in a webinar about these recent decisions and even more pleased to offer readers the opportunity to register for the event for free. 

The 90-minute webinar will be held on July 17, 2013, beginning at 3 p.m. Eastern time.  Among the cases that will be discussed are:

  • Vance v. Ball State University: Are there steps an employer should take to reduce the potential for harassment liability based on “supervisor” actions? 
  • University of Southwestern Texas Medical Center v. Nassar: Is this the end of retaliation claims as we know them, or a case that only lawyers can love?
  • American Express v. Italian Colors Restaurant: Should an employer consider changes to arbitration agreements? 
  • Genesis HealthCare Corp. v. Symczyk: A new defense for employers facing a collective-action lawsuit for unpaid wages?

We also will briefly discuss the potential impact of the Fisher v. University of Texas affirmative action decision, the recess appointments of NLRB members, and whether Congress will take steps to undo any of these Supreme Court decisions.

Can employers demand to see an employee’s or applicant’s social-networking profile? To learn the answer to that and related questions, I hope you will join us for a free 90-minute webinar on Thursday, July 12, from 3-4:30 p.m. EDT.

About the Webinar

Recent press reports indicate that many employers are beginning to require job applicants to disclose their login information and passwords in order to access Facebook accounts and other private information contained in various forms of social media. They are doing this in large part out of frustration due to resume fraud, an inability to obtain meaningful references, and concerns over allegations of negligent hiring. These practices raise a number of significant privacy concerns and legal issues. This session will provide a national perspective on issues including:

The Family and Medical Leave Act has been a part of the workplace for more than a decade, so it’s gotten easier for HR to administer, right? Not so. Confusing regulations, coupled with numerous recent changes at both the legislative and regulatory levels and conflicting court decisions, ensure that FMLA continues to be one of the biggest compliance headaches for employers.

The FMLA Master Class can help you clarify the confusion surrounding the numerous legislative and regulatory changes to the Family and Medical Leave Act and get answers to all your FMLA questions at this advanced-level seminar just for Delaware employers.


Last week, I appeared on the The Proactive Employer, talking about all things workplace social media with host Stephanie Thomas, and fellow employment-law blogger, Jon Hyman of the Ohio Employers’ Law Blog.  The 60-minutes was over before we knew it but, lucky for you, if you missed the live version, you can listen to a recording of the show by either streaming it from the Proactive Employer site, or by downloading it from iTunes. 

Jonathan T. Hyman of the Ohio Employer’s Law Blog and I will be guests on this week’s edition of The Proactive Employer podcast with Stephanie R. Thomas, Ph.D. Jon and I are not only friends from the employment-law blogosphere but we also collaborated on the book, Think Before You Click, Strategies for Manging Social Media in the Workplace, together. Jon served as editor and co-author and I wrote the chapter on the interplay between privacy and social media.

On the podcast, we’ll be discussing some of the many issues relating to social media for employers, sharing tips on social-media policies, and offering suggestions on how to ensure employees are using social media safely. We’ll also be fielding questions and comments from listeners.

The podcast airs live on Thursday, May 24, beginning at 3 p.m. Eastern Time and will be available as a download therafter. I hope you can join us then!

Delaware employers, you’ve got less than a week to register for the year’s most popular employment-law seminar. May 9 is just around the corner, but there is still time to register if you haven’t already done so. We’ve already beat our previous records in number of attendees but there are still seats available.

We are very pleased to announce that Delaware PERB Executive Director Deborah Murray-Sheppard will be joining Bill Bowser, Scott Holt, and Mike Stafford, for the Public Sector Update.

The details, including how to register, are available on the Seminar Event webpage. We hope to see you there!

If you are a legal blawgger or considering the idea, you may want to consider attending an upcoming CLE hosted by the ABA titled, Is Your Legal Blog Compliant?

The 90-minute webinar will be held on April 24, 2012, beginning at 1 p.m. Eastern Time. Here’s the description from the webinar registration page:

If your law firm has a blog and you have not paid attention to the matter of Hunter v. Virginia State Bar, you want to participate in this ethics CLE that addresses what amounts to a case of first impression in how blogs are interpreted under the Modern Rules of Professional Conduct.

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