Articles Posted in Just for Fun

Communication is key to success. The better employees understand the objective and the rules for achieving the objective, the more productive they are and the more likely it is that the objective will be achieved.  But communication isn’t easy.  In fact, I’d venture to guess that most of us have been in a workplace where the communication was kept to an inner circle,  where the message seemed to be ever-changing, or where the higher-ups didn’t seem to understand how important communication really is.

Yet, the quest for better internal communication seems to be never ending.  Sometimes, the way to tackle a difficult problem is to start over.  Taking a fresh look at an old problem can remind us that simpler is better.  Speak a language that people understand.  Corporate-speak is just plain alienating to most humans. 

Delta offers a great example of the idea that speaking the language of your intended audience is the key to successful communications.  As a tribute to Delta’s first safety video, which premiered in the 1980s, Delta released an 80s-themed safety videos.  The video’s description explains the idea behind a truly entertaining safety video-“to reward even the most frequent of frequent flyers for paying attention.”

I spent the first half of my recent vacation in Vienna, Austria.  It was my first visit to to Vienna and I found the city to be absolutely enchanting with it deep roots in the arts, jaw-dropping architecture, and irresistible sweets.  Being the employment lawyer that I am, though, I can’t resist writing a post about some of the HR lessons one could learn from Vienna.

Vienna State Opera House

1.  Get out and walk around

I spent hours each day walking around the city.  Although I had a list of sites I wanted to visit and things I wanted to do, I found that some of my best experiences occurred more or less by accident.  For example, some of the best pictures I took on this trip were taken during unplanned walks.

Every year, I go away for a few days on January 1st in an effort to refresh following the hectic holiday season. Having had enough of winter by January, I usually head south and spend three or four days with friends and family in Florida. But this year, I took a very different approach. Instead of four days in the Sunshine state, I headed overseas for 8 days. I spent the first four in Vienna, Austria, and the second four in Budapest, Hungary. It was a fantastic trip and I returned refreshed in a different way.Molly DiBianca

Here are three of the lessons I learned during my great escape.

1. Make the Time

Most of the time, HR and employment law are serious topics. But, sometimes, they can be seriously funny. Today, I read something that qualified for the latter description. It strikes me as so funny that I just have to share it with you, dear readers.

Regular readers may recall a post I wrote a while back about the dangers of communicating with email. Recent research seems to confirm what many of us have long suspected–that recipients are more likely to give a negative connotation to email than they would if the same conversation had taken place face-to-face.

love-emoticon.jpgSome smart folks had suggested that the use of emoticons in emails would help to communicate the tone of the message and could help to prevent unintended negative inferences. I enthusiastically endorsed the idea and admitted that I use emoticons a lot already–probably a lot more than most people in general and almost certainly more than most lawyers.

Our Annual Employment Seminar has the topic of presentations on my mind this week. Like many of my employment-law colleagues, I do a lot of public speaking. I recently looked back at my speaking schedule for 2011 and was surprised to see that I averaged almost 1 speaking engagement per week. If it was up to me, I’d likely speak even more often but, again, my day job makes that difficult.

Being a good speaker is not easy–even for those of us who love it. It’s a craft and, like any craft, requires lots of practice and continued improvement. One guaranteed way to improve is to watch yourself–nothing shows flaws like a live video recording. A less traumatic way to improve is to watch other speakers. By paying attention to what they do well and what irks you can be a very effective training tool.

Here are two videos to get you started in your studies. The first is an updated version of Don McMillan’s Life After Death by PowerPoint:

I had the pleasure of attending an event last week at which humorist Dave Barry was the keynote speaker. As you may be able to deduce from my lunatic-like grin, I am a big fan of Mr. Barry’s. I was very excited about hearing him speak and had been looking forward to the event for several months. I wasn’t disappointed. Dave Barry was hilarious. The audience was doubled over in their chairs with laughter for most of his talk.

DSC_0116.JPGAfter the event was over, I reflected on the lessons that could be excavated from his talk. What words of wisdom could be parsed from the humor and held like fragile gems of truth to be used later? If you’ve read Dave Barry’s work, either as a columnist for the Miami Herald or as the author of a few dozen books, you likely know the answer already. None.

That’s right. Dave Barry didn’t impart any words of wisdom or gems of truth. He didn’t lecture about the ways in which we could all work to improve the world. And he didn’t prosthelytize any political position. He just made us laugh. He told funny stories that were funny because they were true. And the stories made us laugh.

Sheldon Sandler took the picture below during a recent trip to Granada. Yes, it’s a real picture of a real sign on the outside of a real factory.

Granada.pngAdmittedly, the picture evokes mixed emotions for me. Part of me cheers, happy for the employer who attempts to set a positive tone for workers about to start their workday.

On the other hand, though, the sign seems to send, well, a bit of a mixed message, doesn’t it? Nothing like beating someone with a baseball bat imprinted with a motivational message as a technique to motivate workers, right?

The job application and screening process is key to finding and retaining valuable employees. As employment attorneys, we talk a lot about the Do’s and Don’ts of job interviews and background checks. So, when we came across Thomas Edison’s job interview quiz, we thought it was worth a look.  What we discovered is that we couldn’t get a job with Thomas Edison. Could you?

You may recall our previous post about a young lawyer who sued his former employer. The lawyer, Gregory Berry, had sent an email to the firm’s partners, in which he stated, “it has become clear that I have as much experience and ability as an associate many years my senior, as much skill writing, and a superior legal mind to most I have met.” Not surprisingly, Mr. Berry’s arrogance was not well received, and he lost his job. He then sued his former employer, seeking over $75 million in damages.

Mr. Berry must have been stunned, then, when his lawsuit was dismissed earlier this week. The court dismissed the suit on the grounds that Mr. Berry had executed a valid release of his claims in exchange for a $27,000 severance payment. Consequently, his claims were barred. The court rejected Mr. Berry’s argument that he signed the “unconscionable” agreement under economic duress.

But this story isn’t over! In keeping with the self-aggrandizing attitude evident in Mr. Berry’s email, he left the Courtroom before the Judge had finished issuing her ruling. She has now ordered the parties to attend a hearing on January 24, for purposes of considering a contempt ruling against Mr. Berry, reports Above the Law.

In today’s litigious society, it’s always nice to take a step back and appreciate the problems we don’t have–even if that means indulging in a little schadenfreude. In that spirit, I give you the story of Jill McGlone, a civil servant in Norfolk Virginia. calendar and clock

Ms. McGlone has sued her former employer for wrongful termination. Generally an employee’s allegations of wrongful termination don’t raise eyebrows,  but this case presents unique circumstances. Ms. McGlone was terminated in 2010, after a 12-year paid suspension, during which time she allegedly received approximately $320,000 in compensation. It is also alleged that during her suspension, McGlone continued to receive benefits and annual raises.

It’s still unclear how Ms. McGlone’s situation was allowed to continue for 12 years. It appears that after she was suspended in 1998 for alleged workplace misconduct, her supervisor never resolved her employment status. The issue was not reviewed again until 2010, when a new director was appointed to oversee the agency for which Ms. McGlone “worked.” Since Ms. McGlone’s situation came to light, five other individuals have been terminated for allowing her suspension to continue unresolved. Possible civil and criminal charges are still being considered.

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