Articles Posted in Gender (Title VII)

This article was written by Lauren Moak Russell. I’m in California for two weeks, taking depositions, and am very thankful for the contribution in my absence.

This has been a month of major changes in the employment law landscape in Delaware. In addition to the Supreme Court’s three major decisions affecting employment law (addressing retaliation and harassment under Title VII, and the constitutionality of the federal Defense of Marriage Act) and the legalization of gay marriage, Delaware also passed a law prohibiting employment and other types of discrimination on the basis of an individual’s gender identity. Here is what Delaware employers need to know about the new statute.

What Is Gender Identity?

Being beautiful ain’t all it’s cracked up to be.  Or so it seems from the legal-news headlines.

First, there are the “Borgata Babes.”  The female cocktail servers at Borgata Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, known as Borgata Babes, challenged the legality of their employer’s policy prohibiting them from gaining more than 7% of their body weight after they were hired.  The Babes lost the lawsuit, though, when a New Jersey judge granted Borgata’s motion for summary judgment.

The cocktail servers alleged that the hotel created a culture of humiliation and harassment with its dress

Today’s post is more of a rant than anything close to a legal analysis.  Yesterday, Mark Hansen of the ABA Journal reported about a sentence issued by a judge in Halifax County, N.C.

The defendant, a 21-year-old female, Tonie Marie King, pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly and resisting arrest.  Police were called to the scene in response to a call alleging that King hold stolen beer from a convenience store.  When police arrived, King put up a fight and kicked the arresting officer.image_3

Judge Brenda Branch sentenced King to 45 days in jail but suspended the sentence in lieu of a one-year supervised probation, during which she may not possess or drink alcohol and-now here’s the kicker-she must write a two-page essay on “How a Lady Should Behave In Public.”

Gender discrimination happens. Let’s not pretend that it doesn’t. I have not, in my short life as a lawyer, ever felt that I was not getting the same opportunities as my male counterparts. But I don’t pretend that it doesn’t happen. Recently, I had an interaction with a senior lawyer from an out-of-state firm that reminded me how lucky I am.

Let me set the scene. The event was hosted by lawyers and held for lawyers. So, waitstaff aside, everyone present was a practicing lawyer. When I arrived, I saw a female colleague of mine (a lawyer), and went over to say hello.

Standing with her was a junior female associate and a senior male partner, both from the same firm. I reached out to shake the partner’s hand and introduce myself. As I did, he said, “You look like you’re from the Mid-West.”

The EEOC has enjoyed several victories in recent months. For example, the EEOC was granted summary judgment in a hostile-environment claim filed on behalf of a class of black construction workers. Even more recently, the EEOC was awarded summary judgment in an age-discrimination lawsuit against the City of Baltimore. But things haven’t been all peaches and cream for the EEOC.

In EEOC v. McPherson Cos., Inc., a federal district court in Alabama granted summary judgment to the defendant-employer in a sexual-harassment lawsuit brought by the EEOC on behalf of an unnamed male employee. The employee worked in a warehouse with an all-male workforce.

The EEOC alleged that, after being subject to a constant barrage of “ugly talk,” the employee complained to his supervisor about the allegedly hostile work environment. About a year later, the employee confronted his co-workers, who apologized and, thereafter, stopped directing rude comments his way. About a year after that, the employee complained to HR, which investigated the complaint, resulting in discipline for several workers and two supervisors. After this last complaint, the comments ceased.

I’ve posted more than my share of stories involving allegations by employees that they were terminated because they were “too sexy” for the job. For example, there was the female banker who sued Citigroup, alleging that she was terminated for being “too sexy for her job.” Then there was the data-entry employee who was terminated from her job in a lingerie warehouse for, she alleged, wearing what her employer considered to be clothing that was “too sexy.”

Usually, this type of allegation involves at least some level of grandiose delusion and almost always involves the employee’s belief that everyone hates her for being so darn good looking. But today’s post goes much closer to the realm of the legitimate. Because this post involves an actual court decision. On December 21, the Iowa Supreme Court unanimously ruled that there was no unlawful discrimination where a dentist terminated his dental assistant of 10 years after his wife became jealous.

For his part, the dentist admitted that the assistant was a good employee and wasn’t fired for poor performance. Instead, he claimed that her tight clothing was too distracting and felt that he wouldn’t be able to resist her charms if she remained in his employ any longer, reports CNN.

Northern Delaware managed to escape Sandy largely unscathed, I feel very lucky to say. Our thoughts are with those who are still without power and, especially, with those whose homes were damaged by the storm. I am grateful to be able to return to work, though. In the spirit of maintaining normalcy, today’s post is not going to focus on hurricanes, floods, or other natural disasters. Just employment law. Stay safe, everyone.

No federal employment law expressly prohibits discrimination against an employee because of the employee’s involvement in domestic violence. For many employers, the idea of intentionally discriminating against a victim of domestic violence may be difficult to envision, even. I have seen this issue manifested in a few different contexts.

First, there’s the employee who is chronically absent from work as a result of domestic violence at home. In that case, the employer wants to know whether it is lawful to discipline the employee for her absenteeism, or whether it must permit her some type of leeway because the absences are not merely a result of the employee playing “hooky.” This question is particularly difficult when the employer’s attendance policy distinguishes between “excused” and “unexcused” absences.

Want some free anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training? Well, have I got a deal for you! Mystery Diners is a reality show on the Food Network. The show’s concept involves a father-daughter team who pretend to be employees and/or customers at a target restaurant in order to help the owner uncover the “leaks in the dam” so to speak.

An episode that aired last week, called, “Managing Disaster,” could be used as a workplace best-practices training video. In short, you could use the video to train employees that any of the conduct by the restaurant’s manager should be considered prohibited conduct in your workplace.

Yes, it really was that bad. And I mean bad. Let me take a moment to run through just a few examples of conduct that occurred during the hiring process.

Sex, drugs, and rock ‘n roll. Employment law can involve any or all three. Which explains why it takes a certain personality to really love this gig. Lately, though, I’ve seen a bevy of employment-law stories involving claims based on or involving beautiful people.

Last week, for example, I reported on yet another story involving a woman who claims she was fired from her data-entry job in a lingerie warehouse for being too sexy. [Ed. Note: This story, which involves a woman alleging she was too sexy for her job in a lingerie warehouse owned by Orthodox Jews, should clear up any doubt about why I love my job.] This wasn’t the first story of this kind, though. I’ve reported about at least two similar claims in the past couple of years. And I recently reported about a gender-discrimination claim based on the plaintiff’s part-time job as a dancer.

Michael Schmidt of the Social Media Employment Law Blog reports a different type of case involving exotic dancers. [Ed. Note: Michael’s post is overflowing with hilarity in the form of well-crafted double entendres. For a great read, be sure to jump over to his original post, Slowly Stripping Away Privacy Rights. Brava, Michael!] In In re Penthouse Executive Club Compensation Litigation, No. 10-cv-1145 (KMV) (S.D.N.Y. May 10, 2012), the employer-defendant sought to compel one of the plaintiffs, an “entertainer in the Penthouse Executive Club,” to produce nine pages of Facebook messages that she’d exchanged with other plaintiffs and with non-parties about others joining the FLSA suit.

Is it unlawful to fire an employee for being too sexy?  Well, it depends.  That’s the claim that a New Jersey woman filed with the EEOC, though, so she and her lawyer must think so.  Lauren Odes, 29, worked in her data-entry job for just one week before she was let go.  She claims that there was no dress code in place and that other employees wore very casual “athletic wear,” which makes sense given the fact that they were working in a warehouse instead of a traditional office environment.  Odes claims, though, that, in the first few days on the job, her supervisors cautioned her that her outfits were too provocative, “her lips and hair, ‘too fresh,'” and her breasts too big. On one occasion, according to the Huffington Post, she was given a bathrobe to wear over her clothes. fireball icons_3

Finally, she alleges that she was told that she was just “too hot” for the workplace.  Gloria Allred has taken up the case.  Odes’ Charge alleges gender- and religious-discrimination claims.

And where, you might ask, does religion play into this?  The employer is owned by an Orthodox Jewish family and, Odes claims, they were trying to impose their religious beliefs on her with respect to appropriate attire.  As if there weren’t enough irony in this story already, the employer is a lingerie company.  It seems to me that the fact that the company sold, in Odes’ words, “thongs with hearts placed in the female genital area” would be evidence against Ms. Odes’ claim that she was targeted for her religious beliefs.

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