Writing References #4: 40 of the Best Books on Writing

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 26, 2009In: Resources

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Who vs. Whom.  It's a classic grammar question.  The answer? Beats me. Well, if I don't have any help, that is.  In reality, if I have a writing question that's got me stumped, I just look up the answer.  And, as high-tech as my world tends to be most times, nothing beats a good, old fashioned paper reference. 

Previously, I posted about 10 of the Funniest Writing Blogs.  If you missed that post, go check it out--you're guaranteed a laugh from the very particular bloggers who feel so passionately about things like the overuse of quotation marks. MONTBLANC

In the second post in the series, I offered readers a list of 20 Online Dictionaries, which included everything from the Dictionary of Philly Slang (our native language), to the RhymeZone, to the Dictionary of Sushi.  You can never have too many reference sources, right? 

In the third post in the series, I named 30 of the Best Writing Blogs.  Some of the blogs focus on legal writing, some are strictly business (writing, that is), and some are whatever they want to be on any given day.  Other great writing blogs were added via comments by readers, so be sure to check out those additions, as well. 

But today's post is all about the real thing--books as references.  Below are 40 of my most turned-to sources, broken down into four categories:  (1) Style and Usage Guides; (2) Business Writing (3) General Writing and Grammar; and (4) Legal Writing. 

 

Please don't be shy--add your favorites that I may have overlooked in the Comments section.

 

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Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act Will Become First Pro-Labor Legislation of 2009

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 25, 2009In: Equal Pay, Gender (Title VII), Legislative Update, Purely Legal

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The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 has passed the Senate and could be on President Obama's desk within days.  The wage-discrimination statute, Senate Bill 181, reverses a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2007, which narrowly defines the time period during which an employee can file a claim of wage discrimination.  This may be the first piece of legislation signed by the new President.  Obama has been a strong advocate for the legislation.  Lilly Ledbetter, the plaintiff in the lawsuit that inspired the legislation, was invited to the inauguration.

The bill was approved during the first week of the new congressional session, perhaps indicative of the momentum behind the expected pieces of labor legislation.shutterstock_2935217

In Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tires, the case at the center of the legislation's history, the Court held that the discriminatory act, which starts the clock running on the time period to file a claim, occurs at the time of the discriminatory decision.  In other words, in a failure-to-promote claim, the date of the promotion decision is the date when the clock begins to run.  Ledbetter argued that the clock would begin to run each time a new paycheck was issued because each paycheck represented a new discriminatory act--the unequal payment of wages.  Ledbetter claimed that she did not know that she had been getting paid less than her male counterparts until a note was left in her mailbox at the end of her 19-year career with the company. 

Opponents of the law contend that it will effectively eliminate a statute of limitations period and could result in increased filings of unmeritorious lawsuits.  Employers will be hard pressed to "disprove" the decision- making process involved in a pay raise issued 20 years earlier. 

A middle ground, offered by Republican Senator Kay Bailey Hutchinson would have started the time period when the employee knew or had reason to know that discrimination was occurring.  Hutchinson said her alternative would protect both employee and employer. 

The alternative was rejected by women's-rights advocates, as the issue has become one largely divided on gender lines.  Women's-rights groups argue that the law is necessary to protect women from continued unequal pay.  Very little has been mentioned about the fact that the Ledbetter bill would apply to other protected classes, such as race, ethnicity, and national origin--not just gender.

What Other Great Minds Have to Say

Several e-law bloggers have already issued their insights on the legislation, so have a look at some of these posts to learn more about the ins and outs of what may be the first pro-employee legislation passed in 2009:

John Phillips at The Word on Employment Law, Fair Pay Act Ready to Become Law

Michael Moore at the PA Labor and Employment Blog, Ledbetter Fair Pay Act passed by Senate and awaiting Obama Signature

Jon Hyman at the OH Employment Law blog, Ledbetter passes Senate – President’s signature is next

Frank Steinberg at the NJ Employment Law Blog, Ledbetter Act Passes Senate

Ross Runkel at LawMemo, Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 awaits President's Signature 

Dennis Westlind at The World of Work, Senate Passes Lilly Ledbetter Bill 61-36

Dan Schwartz at the CT Employment Law Blog, Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 Passes Senate, 61-36; President Will Sign

Tracing the Story Back to the Beginning

And to read about the bill since its inception, see the following posts:

Equal Pay Becomes Front Runner as Lilly Ledbetter Act Takes Center Stage

Equal Pay: Fair Pay Restoration Act Voted Down in Senate

More Fodder for the Fair Pay Debate

A New Day for Employers

 

Employers should stay tuned to what may be the first in a series of legislation that advocates for employees to the disadvantage of businesses.

Top 10 Ways Managers Can Engage Employees

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 23, 2009In: Employee Engagement

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An engaged workforce doesn't occur by accident.  It requires a lot of work and a lot of attention.  At the end of the day, it's the front-line managers who can make the biggest difference in spreading the passion and enthusiasm required for engagement.  What follows after the jump are the 10 best ways managers can ensure that they're doing their part to achieve the ideal conditions suitable for an engaged workforce.

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Security Breach of Personal Data Could Be the Largest Ever

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 22, 2009In: Privacy Rights of Employees

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The possibility of identity theft has become a reality for tens of millions of credit and debit cardholders.  Yesterday, Heartland Payment Systems, a major payment processing company, revealed that its secure systems had been hacked and that the private data of millions of individuals may have been stolen.  This is said to be the largest data breach ever. identity theft

The N.Y. Time reports that those responsible for the massive theft could be part of an “international ring of hackers that are introducing breaches at a number of financial institutions.”  With an operation of this magnitude, it seems likely that this is the case--that the breach was a result of highly organized criminal entities.  But, more commonly, the theft of personal data is not so far-reaching or as complex.  An, often, it is the result of actions by an insider--an employee--who leaks the data for revenge or for money, or both.

For example, in December of 2008, an employee of Certegy Check Services, physically removed 2.3 million consumer data records to resell. The former employee sold consumer information to a data broker, who then sold it to a number of direct marketing companies.

Another example occurred in September of 2008, when Countrywide Mortgage notified the FBI that a former employee had sold customers' personal information to a third party, including names, addresses, social security numbers and application information. The FBI arrested the employee and reported that as many as two million people may have had their data stolen.

Then there was the case of the unauthorized sale of Britney Spears' sealed psychiatric information to the National Enquirer by an employee of the UCLA Medical Centre.  The employee was later prosecuted for the breach, was is believed to have been a series of disclosures over a period of several months.

Employers who've not yet implemented an effective procedure for responding to the unauthorized access of employees' personal data should consider the Heartland story a real wake-up call about the realities of identity theft.  No one is immune from a potential security breach.  But everyone should know what to do if one does occur. 

Work-Life Issues Spotlighted by Michelle Obama's Appointment of New Policy Director

Posted by Adria B. MartinelliOn January 21, 2009In: Newsworthy, Women In (and Out of) the Workplace

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President Obama’s commitment to work-family issues is a topic I've posted about previously.  I've also posted about the President's campaign platform on work-life and work-family issues.  I’ve wondered, however, given the many larger issues on the President’s plate, whether these matters would truly be a focus once he was in office. Michelle Obama has made it clear it is a focus of hers, even while her husband is tending to other matters. She solidified her commitment to the issue by her appointment, as reported in the Wall Street Journal, of fellow attorney and Harvard Law School classmate Jocelyn Frye, general counsel of the National Partnership for Women and Families, as her Policy Director. michelle obama work life balance

Obama’s naming of Frye last Friday suggests she’s preparing to take an activist stance on such policy issues as family leave and flexible scheduling. Frye has been a long-time advocate of expanding family leave and ending pregnancy discrimination.  

The National Partnership for Women and Families drafted and lobbied for the 1993 Family & Medical Leave Act, which entitles many workers to up to 12 weeks unpaid time off for family care and other reasons. Their “proposed agenda for the new administration,” posted on the Partnership’s Web site, includes a much-expanded FMLA, guaranteeing employees of companies with 15 or more workers access to seven paid sick days a year, and also for the federal government to provide incentives for the states to set up paid family-leave insurance plans. The brief also calls for equal access to family leave for part-time workers, income supports to allow working parents in poverty to care for new children at home, and federal policies to give workers more control over their schedules, including the right to refuse mandatory overtime.

Let’s hope that Michelle Obama’s commitment to the cause, and her appointment of Frye, result in some real developments on work-family issues!

Why the Four-Day Work Week Should Not Be Considered a "Flexible Schedule"

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 20, 2009In: Alternative Work Schedules

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The four-day work week is touted as a way for employers to offer employees a more flexible schedule.  The demand for flexible and alternative schedules continues to grow.  There are a number of reasons for this increased demand.  The influx of Generation Y workers has played a role, for one.  Also, the increased focus on work-life balance mandates the need for flexible scheduling.  And, as the workplace becomes more and more mobile, the need for office workers to actually work from the office continues to diminish.   Flexible Work Schedule Hourglass and planner

There are many ways in which employers can implement flexible-schedule programs.  When done right, these programs can act as ways to recruit the best candidates and retain the best employees.  But not all flexible workplace programs are created equally.  And, in my opinion, one of the most hyped offerings, the four-day work week, doesn't meet the criteria at all.  In a short post for the Sloan Work and Family Research Network, I write about Why the Four-Day Work Week Would Be the Death of the Flexible-Schedule Initiative.  In the post, I address some of the reasons why I think the four-day work schedule cannot, by definition, classify as a "flexible work schedule." 

Searching MySpace and Facebook for Job Applicants and . . . Judges?

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 19, 2009In: Social Media in the Workplace

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Employers who use MySpace and Facebook as hiring tools have been the subject of some debate.  Employers have used MySpace to screen potential job candidates.  Employers have fired employees for something posted on the employee's Facebook and MySpace pages.  Even the incoming White House administration is requiring applicants to disclose any potentially embarrassing content on social networking sites.  Recently, there was some discussion about the use of social networking sites as a way to defend an employer in an employment litigation lawsuit. judge in robes with gavel

And now, there's talk of yet another purpose for the use of online profiles.  In the Fall issue of Litigation News, a quarterly magazine published by the ABA's Litigation Section, an article entitled Know Thy Judge advocates conducting an internet search on the judge assigned to your case.  Specifically, the article suggests that counsel should "Google the judge" before appearing in his or her courtroom, in the hopes of gaining insight on the judge's personality, habits, or tendencies. 

I wouldn't expect that many judges maintain public Facebook or MySpace pages.  But, in twenty years, when the bench is filled with Gen Ys wearing black robes, will their "internet past" play a relevant and important role?  It seems inevitable, doesn't it?  Especially in light of the recent report that the number of adults using online networking tools has quadrupled in the past three years. 

How to Participate in Today's National Day of Service

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 19, 2009In: Internet Resources, Locally Speaking

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Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.  It is also the national day of service and the first day of President-elect Obama’s initiative to Renew America Together.  In communities around the First State, as well as in neighborhoods around the country, Americans are volunteering to help others.  If you would like to join in this growing initiative but don't know of any particular activities in your local area, check out USAService.org.   Here, you can search by zip code or by state and find a list of events being held today that would benefit from any time you can contribute.  And the website isn't just a great resource today.  Its comprehensive database of volunteer and charitable events lists the many opportunities that happen throughout the year.

Ergonomic Chair Update: Herman Miller Laptop Stand

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 19, 2009In: Wellness, Health, and Safety

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Previously I posted about my quest for the perfect economic office chairherman miller scooter laptop standAnd, as everyone knows, nothing's more important than the perfect accessory.  When I do manage to find my dream chair, I now know the perfect accessory for it--the Herman Miller Laptop Stand. The Scooter Laptop Stand  provides comfortable and ergonomically correct keyboard and mouse support. The Scooter adjusts in height from 22" to 30" and has a tilt range of 20°. It can be purchased at Amazon for $379 and comes in Solid Cherry, Ash, and Ebony finishes.  

The Number of Adults Who Use Online Social Networking Sites Is Skyrocketing

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 19, 2009In: Privacy In the Workplace, Social Media in the Workplace

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Teens outrank adults in the use of social networking sites by 30%.  But the popularity of social networking sites is not limited to teenagers.  Currently, one-third of adults in the U.S. have a profile at a site like MySpace or Facebook.  And this number is rising.  In fact, the number of adults who utilize these sites has quadrupled since 2005, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project’s December 2008 tracking survey. 

See the full survey here:  

What are the consequences of this skyrocketing use?   They can only be imagined.  As we've posted about previously, employers are taking a hard line when they discover what they consider unacceptable conduct by employees.  With more and more adults spending time on sites like Facebook and its more "grown-up" cousin, LinkedIn, it seems inevitable that there will be more and more terminations resulting to online conduct.

FLSA 105: Recordkeeping Requirements

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 14, 2009In: Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), HR Summer School

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The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), requires employers to make, keep, and preserve records regarding employees and employee compensation.  The FLSA provides a 15-item list of the types of information that the employer has the obligation to obtain.  All primary sources of this information must be preserved for a period of three years for all current and former employees.  All supplementary sources must be preserved for at least two years.  deptoflabor

What Information Am I Required to Keep?

First, you must be familiar with the information for which you are responsible.  The list includes:

  1. Name and SSN;
  2. Home address;
  3. Date of birth if under age 19;
  4. Sex and occupation
  5. Day and time on which the workweek begins;
  6. Hourly rate of pay;
  7. Basis of pay;
  8. Nature of any payment claimed as an exclusion from the regular rate;
  9. Total hours worked for each day and each week;
  10. Total straight (i.e., non-overtime or premium) pay;
  11. Total overtime pay;
  12. Additions and deductions made, including wage assignments;
  13. Total wages paid;
  14. Date of payment and pay period covered; and
  15. The company's sales and purchase records for purposes of determining whether it is an enterprise with an annual business volume of $500,000.

What Are the Primary and Secondary Sources of this Information?

All records that constitute primary sources of the above-listed information must be preserved for a period of three years.  Such records include:

  • payroll records;
  • work certificates;
  • CBAs; and
  • employment contracts.

Supplementary records are the documents that serve as the source documents for other payroll records. Supplementary records may include:

  • time cards;
  • production cards;
  • wage rate tables;
  • piece-rate schedules; and
  • work-time schedules.

What Else Should I Keep and Where Should I Keep It?

Although not required by the FLSA, it is a good idea to retain job descriptions, performance reviews, internal memos, job postings, handbooks, and other materials relating to wage classifications and pay practices that you could use to justify your pay practices during an audit, for a period of at least three years.

The FLSA requires that all records be kept at the place or places of employment or at one or more established central record-keeping offices, where such records are customarily maintained.  If kept outside the place of employment, they must be available within 72 hours of a request by the U.S. Department of Labor.

And, finally, don't forget about your posting requirements.  Employers must post notices in the workplace that state the requirements of the FLSA. 

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), is a very challenging statute to apply correctly.  For more information about legal compliance with the federal wage and hour laws, see the following posts:

Top 5 FLSA Topics

Executive Exemptions and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

5 Words of Warning about Improper Deductions and the FLSA

FLSA FAQ: Overtime and Unpaid Leave

FLSA 101: Who Is Covered Under the Fair Labor Standards Act?

FLSA 102: Minimum Wage Requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act

FLSA 103: Defining What Constitutes "Hours Worked"

FLSA 104: Overtime and the Fair Labor Standards Act

The Revolution of Thank You

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 14, 2009In: Employee Engagement

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Leadership blogger, Ed Brenegar, of Leading Questions, is a finalist in the Johnny Bunko 7th lesson contest.  If you aren't familiar with the contest, it's a big deal. To become a finalist, Ed submitted his vision on the relationship dynamic in the professional work environment.  The concept is called, To Say Thanks Every Day and it can be described as the revolution of the "thank you."

Voting is only open through Thursday, January 15, so visit the Johnny Bunko contest website to register your vote.  While you're there, be sure to have a look at some of the more than 50 entries for the contest.  Don't know who or what Johnny Bunko is?  Oh no!  How about Daniel Pink?  BusinessWeek Best Seller?  How about that?  The book, Johnny Bunko, written by Daniel Pink, was a literary phenomenon in 2008 in the business world.  image From the book's website:

The Adventures of Johnny Bunko is America’s first business book in manga and the last career guide you’ll ever need. 

The book, which you can read in an hour, tells the story of Johnny Bunko, a beleaguered Everyman toiling away at the Boggs Corp

One night Johnny meets Diana, a magical and butt-kicking adviser who teaches Johnny -- and you -- the six lessons of satisfying, productive careers:

1. There is no plan.

2. Think strengths, not weaknesses

3. It’s not about you.

4. Persistence trumps talent.

5. Make excellent mistakes

6. Leave an imprint.

The book could be described as "the revolution of the Everyman."  Revolutions all around!  Check out Ed's entry on the real value of saying "thank you," as well as the other top contenders.  Then be sure to pick up the Johnny Bunko book and give yourself the sixty (or ninety) minutes it takes to read it cover to cover.  Enjoy the revolution.

Women Who Bully Women at Work

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 14, 2009In: Jerks at Work, Women In (and Out of) the Workplace

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Bullying in the workplace has been a hot topic in the labor and employment world since 2007, when The Workplace Bullying Institute published a revealing survey on the topic. Since then, the subject of Jerks at Work has played a regular role in scholarly discussions about how employers can work to improve the working environment.  The attention, at least from legal scholars, has been focused on the overlap between unlawful harassment and the bullying epidemic.  So the theory goes, bullying conduct looks enough like harassing conduct that a jury could reasonably interpret the former as the latter. 

I speak frequently on the topic and, when making a case for the implementation and enforcement of anti-bullying policies, I explain it as a matter of simple business sense.  Happy people don't sue.  (Most of the time.)  But pissed-off people make great plaintiffs.  Pick on someone long enough and be mean enough and it's just a matter of time until the person reacts.  The reaction can come in a myriad of forms, all of which are adverse to the employer's interest.   Workplace violence is one possible response to bullying experienced by workers.  Legal action is another. 

This topic also comes up when I give general employment discrimination training or harassment-prevention training.  When discussing the legal elements of harassment, I tell attendees that the harassing conduct must be because of a protected class.  If a male supervisor terminates a female employee, this is not gender discrimination.  For gender discrimination to exist, the termination decision must have been made because of the employee's gender.  There is a principle in discrimination law that stands for the idea that, where the alleged discriminator is in the same protected class as the plaintiff-employee, it is less likely that discrimination occurred. 

At this point in the lecture, I laugh to myself because I know what comes next.  I give some examples of this principle at work.  If a worker alleges that he was not hired because of his age, the fact that the hiring manager was older than the candidate weighs against the candidate.  Similarly, if an employee complains that he was unlawfully terminated because of his race (Indian), the fact that the manager who made the decision to terminate also is of Indian origin will weigh in the employer's favor.  I go on to give another example involving an employee who is not promoted and files a charge of discrimination alleging gender discrimination.  Just as in the other examples, if the manager who made the promotion decision also is a woman, this fact will weigh against the employee's case.  I then say, "As any woman in this room will attest, this idea is ridiculous.  Women are treated the worst by other women."  All the women in the room laugh--the truth is funny. 

If she had been in the training session, Peggy Klaus of the N.Y. Times would have laughed, too.  In her recent article, A Sisterhood of Workplace Infighting, Klaus discusses the reality that exists among women at work. As she puts it, "we can be our own worst enemies at work."  She cites the Workplace Bullying Institute's study, which found that women bullies target other women 70% of the time, whereas male bullies are equal-opportunity abusers. 

Why is it that this dynamic is so true?  Why is it that women are most likely to pick on other women at work?  Although this certainly has been true for as long as women have had a seat at the table, I think that the tides have begun to turn and that women are comfortable enough in their seats so that they have no need to worry about someone kicking them out. 

Wellness Resolution: The Quest for the Perfect Ergonomic Office Chair

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 12, 2009In: Internet Resources, Wellness, Health, and Safety

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Walking while you work was the topic of an earlier post. This post stays within the same theme--how to be healthy at work--but with a different perspective--mine.  I have some thoughts of my own on this topic. 

For one, I would cherish the opportunity to move more through the day without sacrificing working time.  It's not the walking part, really, as much as it's the idea of not sitting that I find attractive.  Basically, anything that involves me not sitting would be of value.  Alternatively, sitting comfortably and without permanently wrecking my posture would be a heck of an idea.

Somehow, I've never gotten around to buying one and my back really pays the price for my indecisiveness.  What's stopping me?  There's just too many from which I could choose!  But that's not to say that I haven't given it a lot of thought.  Here's the rundown on my years of searching. image

There's the classic Herman Miller Aeron chair.  Everyone knows that the Aeron is pretty hard to beat when it comes to function and design.  Being a lover of modern furniture, I can admire the Aeron even for the story of its creation--and if you haven't yet read the story, it's a great story of perseverance and dedication, of leadership and teamwork.  Good stuff.  The Executive Aeron can be purchased for approximately $1,300. 

 

Herman Miller also offers the Mirra ($829) and Celle ($629) chairs as less pricey Aeron alternatives. Both chairs come in a variety of colors, which is an advantage over the Aeron.  Color is important. 

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I have to pass on the Aeron because, honestly, it's just not "pretty" enough for me.  Yes, mock me if you will, but at least I'm honest.  I appreciate the aesthetic but I need more glamour than the black mesh has to offer. 

The Freedom chair by Humanscale is next in the rotation.  The Freedom chair (with headrest, ofimage course), also has plenty of design awards on its resume and is known as one of the best in the ergonomic category.  But, to its credit, it comes in a variety of colors and textures, including leather, which happens to be my preference.  At around $1,000, the chair is priced competitively.  The Liberty chair, priced for under $800, is Humanscale's task chair alternative. 

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Next up is Steelcase--the maker of the Walkstation treadmill-desk combo that prompted this post.  Steelcase has plenty to offer in the way of ergonomic seating, the two most popular choices being the Leap and Think chairs.   Both are offered in various colors and both have a contemporary look, with the Think chair's sleek, linear design being my preference between the two. image
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I've been known to be open to new things so it's not surprising that I've given a lot of thought to the out-of-the-ordinary seating options.  For instance, the HAG Capisco saddle chair (in red, below, $690 - $1,200) dares to be different.  Even assuming that it's as comfortable as could be and the look was where I wanted to go, the whole "saddle" concept just doesn't work for me.  The idea is that you can sit in the chair backwards (why, I haven't the foggiest).  Sorry, I wear too many skirts to make this a realistic possibility.  I'll pass, although I do love the height-adjustable feature. In my ideal office, I would have a height-adjustable desk, making this feature quite important.  

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The same principles go for the "stool" option but, in the interest of fairness, I'll list them anyway.   The Swopper Stool by Via (left, $600) is designed to force its user to keep their balance by engaging their abdomen muscles instead of letting us lazy office workers slump over in our traditionally terrible posture.   The HAG Balans Kneeling Chair (right) is even less likely to ever see the four walls of my office.  I've witnessed these in use and, unless you work at a health club or in another industry where you are expected to wear clothes designed for comfort, this option is just impractical.  My devotion to improved posture is not this strong.   

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Now let's get to the serious contenders.  If and when I get around to breaking open the office-chair-piggy-bank, there are just two that make me stand up and cheer. 

First is the Steelcase Leap Worklounge Chair in Leather ($2,700-$3,400 depending on options). steelcase work lounger in leather

It's beautiful.  And that's exactly why I like it.  It comes in white leather, which is my favorite upholstery option (practicality be damned).  There is also an optional ottoman but who has time to put their feet up?  We're working too hard to afford the chair!

 

 

And then there's the ultimate in luxury office seating, the Silver chair by Interstuhl.  Interstuhl is a German company and brings German precision to its line of couture office furniture.  I could say more but the pictures speak for themselves. 

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Beauty is not cheap.  The base model in black will cost you around $4,500.  But why stop there?  If you're going to do luxurious, go all the way.  And Interstuhl has just the chair for satisfying the maximum luxury quotient.  

For a mere $65,500, you can be one of the lucky owners of the world's most expensive office chair.   You'll get not just the chair but the matching ottoman, as well, both of which are plated in 24-karat gold.

 

The chair has even had a few roles on the silver screen.  It was used as Al Pacino's chair in the movie Ocean's 13.  And, more recently, made a cameo in the latest Bond film, Quantum of Solace.

 

News on E-Verify for Federal Contractors

Posted by Teresa A. CheekOn January 12, 2009In: E-Verify

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Mandatory use of E-Verify has been on the agenda for several months.  Today in my inbox I found a message from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), saying that SHRM, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Associated Builders and Contractors, the HR Policy Associate, and the American Council on International Personnel had filed suit in December in the United States District Court for the District of Maryland to stop the OFCCP from requiring federal contractors and subcontractors from using E-Verify.  E-Verify Logo RGB MASTER

On Thursday, January 8, the U.S. Department of Justice agreed to delay the effective date of the new requirement from January 15, 2009, until February 20, 2009, so that the court can conduct a hearing on the merits of SHRM’s claims. The plaintiff organizations argue in their 28-page December 23, 2008, complaint that the government has exceeded its authority by requiring government contractors to follow the new requirements to use E-Verify for not just new employees but also previously verified current employees.

For background on the E-Verify program, see:

Federal Contractor E-Verify Rule Is Final!

DOJ: How to Prevent Discrimination Arising from the Use of E-Verify

E-Verify Employer Dos & Don'ts

GAO Says Universal Mandatory E-Verify Will Be A Challenge