3d Cir. Rules on FMLA Definition of Overnight Stay

By William W. Bowser

Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, an eligible employee can take up to 12 weeks of protected leave for his or her own “serious health condition.” A “serious health condition” is defined by Department of Labor’s regulations as one “that involves inpatient care … or continuing treatment by a health care provider.” While many FMLA cases have focused on the meaning of “continuing treatment,” the definition of “inpatient care” has seen little review. A recent decision by the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers Delaware, recently focused on the issue.

Jeff Bonkowski worked for Oberg Industries as a wirecut operator and machinist. During a meeting with his supervisors on November 14, 2011, Bonkowski began to experience shortness of breath. His supervisors gave him permission to go home and he clocked out at 5:18 p.m. Shortly after 11 p.m., Bonkowski’s wife drove him to the hospital. Although he arrived at the hospital before midnight, he was not admitted into the hospital until shortly after midnight on November 15th. As we will see, these few minutes would be very important.

Bonkowski underwent comprehensive tests and was sent home on evening of the November 15– after staying in the hospital for about 14 hours. Oberg terminated him because he had walked off the job on November 14 and his absence on November 15. Bonkowski filed suit under the FMLA claiming that his absence from work on November 15th was a qualifying absence under the FMLA protecting him from discharge.

The District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania threw out his case. It found that Bonkowski didn’t have a “serious health condition” because he did not receive “inpatient care.” It pointed to the definition of “inpatient care” contained in the DOL’s regulations which requires an “overnight stay in a hospital….” The District Court ruled that in order to have an “overnight stay,” Bonkowski would have to be admitted before sunset on one day and discharged after sunrise the following day. Since Bonkowski was not admitted until after midnight on November 15 and discharged the same day, he did not have an overnight stay.

Bonkowski appealed to the Third Circuit. While the Third Circuit rejected the “sunset-sunrise” rule used by the District Court but still ruled in favor of Oberg. It ruled that an “overnight stay” means a stay in for a substantial period of time from one calendar day to the next day measured from the time of admission to the time of discharge. Since Bonkowski was admitted after midnight on November 14, his stay did not constitute an “overnight stay.” Without such a stay, he could not have received “in patient care” and could not have a “serious health condition.”

The Third Circuit rejected the “sunrise-sunset” rule because the required time in the hospital would vary depending on the season of the year and geographic location. It also rejected Bonkowski’s claim that time spent at the hospital before actual admission should count because the “calendar day” rule would provide a bright line criterion for employers and employees alike.


In sum, Bonkowski FMLA claim was erased because of a few minutes waiting at the hospital. While the result may seem harsh, the rules does, at least, provide an somewhat understandable standard. This case does not resolve what a “substantial” time in the hospital means. In other words, will a stay just before midnight to just after midnight qualify? If not, just how many hours will be required? Stay tuned.

Bonkowski v. Oberg Industries, No. 14-1239 (3d Cir. May 22, 2015)

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