3 Tips for Harassment Investigations

Investigating complaints of inappropriate workplace conduct is a difficult challenge for any number of reasons. But conducting an immediate and thorough investigation is critical to both preventing lawsuits and to avoiding liability should a lawsuit arise. Human-resource professionals often ask for tips in handling this challenge. Here are three.male female sign_3

First, don’t be shy. An investigation of workplace harassment is not the time to be timid. Ask the tough questions and be direct. Don’t mince words or dance around the questions. Consider writing out the questions that you need answers to and actually check them off your list. If you don’t ask a straight question, you’ll never get a straight answer.

Second, don’t decide anything in advance. This is important because, if you’ve already made your mind up before you ask the question, you’ve already failed as an investigator. In order to get the information that you need, you must truly listen. And the interviewee will know if you’re not listening. So keep an open mind and don’t jump to conclusions.

Third, remember that there may be more than one version of the “truth.” It’s rare that I am presented with a complaining witness who I think is actually “lying.” It’s far, far more common that the complainant misunderstood the events or misinterpreted the meaning. And, frequently, for one reason or another, the complainant has repeated the story so many times in his or head that the story has become the truth. In other words, the complainant truly believes that the events occurred the way that he or she is describing them.

There is a tremendous body of social-science research about this third item. Eye-witness accounts can be, well, dead wrong. If you think you’re the exception, or, if you just want to see how differently people can see the same event, you may want to take a look at the “selective attention test” by Daniel Simons and Christopher Chabris.  Watch the video and see how many passes you count and then compare your answer to others . . . and then consider how certain you should be about the observations of the employees you’re interviewing.

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