Story of Delaware Medical Examiner Offers Lesson for Employers

Delaware Chief Medical Examiner Richard T. Callery has made news headlines for his off-duty conduct.  According to The News Journal, Callery is the subject of a criminal investigation relating to his testimony as an expert witness in cases outside of Delaware. 

In short, the claim is that Callery spent a lot of time serving as a paid witness in cases in other States, while neglecting his own duties.  And, to add insult to injury, Callery apparently testified on behalf of the defense in several cases, which, some argue, diminishes his credibility when called to testify in Delaware on behalf of the State.

The lesson to be learned for employers is an important one.  Many employers put limitations on moonlighting by employees.  Such limits may be included in an employment contract or in a personnel handbook. 

The policies vary.  For example, some employers prohibit employees from working in a second job altogether.  Others prohibit only secondary employment in the same field or with the same duties that the employee performs in his or her full-time employment.  And others only prohibit secondary employment that conflicts with the employee’s job duties. 

The State of Delaware, like many employers, does not have such a policy.  But, if it had, it would likely have prohibited Callery from working as an expert witness, even in his off-duty time.  Do you have such a policy?   Should you?

See ME’s side work under criminal investigation, by Jonathan Starkey and Sean O’Sullivan.

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