Chefs and Employment Law: A Valentine’s Day Post

Rumor has it that today is Valentine’s Day.  Being married to a chef-restaurateur, Valentine’s Day doesn’t mean “romantic holiday” to me as much as “very, very busy workday.”  And, for that reason, I’ll dedicate today’s post to the food-service professionals who have a long weekend of work ahead of them.

There are plenty of employment-law topics with a chef or restaurant connection.  Here are a few stories from recent history that come to heart tattoo art_thumb

Wage-and-Hour Claims

Certainly, restaurants are not the only industry subject to wage-and-hour claims by employees.  But there does seem to have been a recent proliferation of settlements of such claims by businesses owned by famous-name chefs.

There was the $5.25 million settlement forked out by Chef Mario Batali in March 2012, over allegations that servers’ tips had been improperly withheld.  Then there was the January 2014 settlement agreement that Chef Daniel Boulud reached with 88 workers who alleged that their pay had been improperly reduced to account for tips, resulting in payment of overtime at an incorrect rate.  The amount of that settlement is confidential.  And, even more recently, there was the $446,500 settlement agreement reached to resolve the wage claims of 130 servers at two NYC restaurants owned by Chef Wolfgang Puck.

Why are so many wage claims against restaurants?  One reason is the complexity of the laws in this area.  The overtime laws are complicated even in the context of an employee who receives hourly wages only.  But, add to that tip credits, earned tips, and tip pooling, and you’ve got a virtual maze of complex issues.  The laws are not easy to navigate, especially without guidance from experienced legal counsel.

Social-Media Use and/or Misuse

I’d be remiss, of course, if I didn’t give at least one social-media related story, too.  So I will end today’s post with a reference to a story about a chef who sent a bunch of not-so-nice tweets from the restaurant’s official Twitter account after he’d been fired but before (apparently) the restaurant had changed the password on its account.

Chef Grant Achatz, owner of Alinea in Chicago, landed in hot water when he tweeted about a couple who brought their 8-month old to dinner.  I have a definite opinion on this story.  Having been to Alinea, I feel very comfortable saying that it is not a place where an 8-month old needs to be and, if the 8-month old is crying at the top of his lungs, it’s not a place where that baby should be.  The restaurant is very expensive, with meals starting at more than $200 per person.  Reservations are wickedly difficult to get with only 80 seats.

Most important, though, is the nature of the experience.  Diners fight for reservations and pay big bucks for a reason–the meal is something you remember forever.  The food is so far beyond anything else, it’s almost an Alice-In-Wonderland experience.  And to have that be ruined by the guests at the table next to you would be, to me anyway, a crushing disappointment.

So, there.  That’s where I stand on the question.  Chef Achatz’s tweet did not offend me or make me adore his restaurant any less.

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