Delaware Mini-COBRA Law Grows

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 15, 2014In: Benefits, Delaware Specific, Legislative Update

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Editor's Note:  This post was written by Timothy J. Snyder, Esq.  Tim is the Chair of Young Conaway's Tax, Trusts and Estates, and Employee Benefits Sections. 

Delaware's Mini-COBRA law, enacted in May 2012, allows qualified individuals who work for employers with fewer than 20 employees to continue their coverage at their own cost, for up to 9 months after termination of coverage.  When it was passed, the legislature provided that the provisions of the Mini-COBRA statute:

shall have no force or effect if the Health Care bill passed by Congress and signed by the President of the United States of America in 2010 is declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States of America or the provisions addressed by this Act are preempted by federal law on January 1, 2014, whichever first occurs.health care

I'm not sure what the Legislature meant when they provided that the Mini-COBRA statue would be preempted by federal law on January 1, 2014 but the intent was for the Mini-COBRA law to sunset on that date. However, in a little-publicized move in July of 2013, the legislature eliminated the January 1, 2014 sunset date for Mini-COBRA. They described their rationale for doing so as follows:

The Mini-COBRA Bill was originally passed as a short-term bill that was needed until the provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("PPACA") became applicable to states, which was to occur on January 1, 2014. However, because PPACA's legislation relating to small employer group health policies now permits insurance companies to impose a ninety (90) day waiting period prior to the effective date of coverage, which was not anticipated when the Mini-COBRA Bill was passed, it is desirable to remove the sunset provision of the Mini-COBRA Bill so that the Mini-COBRA Bill remains in the Delaware Code, at least until a point in time when PPACA or other law may no longer permit an insurance company to impose waiting periods.

I initially thought that the Legislature provided for a January 1, 2014 sunset date because that is the date that coverage begins under the healthcare exchanges, which do not impose waiting periods in the typical COBRA scenario.  Thus, an individual terminated from a small employer could purchase his or her coverage for at least the 90-day waiting period from the exchange rather than requiring the former employer's insurer to provide the mini-COBRA benefit.  In fact, the U.S. Department of Labor, which oversees regular COBRA benefit administration, has issued revised model COBRA Notices that inform the qualified beneficiaries that they can acquire COBRA coverage through their former employer or they can obtain new coverage from the healthcare exchange.

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