Call Me, Maybe. Discovery of Employee Identities

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn January 9, 2013In: Non-Compete Agreements

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Delaware's Court of Chancery is the North Star of the noncompete-litigation universe in the State and, in many respects, in jursidctions around the country. It can also be a tricky galaxy to traverse due to the speed of litigation, the equitable principles that control procedural rules and, on an even more basic level, the fact that many of the court's opinions are not reported. As a result, transcripts of rulings from the bench are commonly cited as binding authority.

But today's post is not about a transcript ruling but about a letter decision, issued by Vice Chancellor Glasscock on October 12, 2012, in NuVasive v. Lanx, Inc., No. 7266-VCG (PDF). In this case, the plaintiff alleged that the defendant had "lured away a number of [its] employees to work for [the defendant], in breach of various duties owed to NuVasive by these employees."

The opinion was issued on the plaintiff's motion to compel the defendant to provide the identities of all of the plaintiff's employees, past and current, with whom the defendant had communicated in the past year about possible employment.

The defendant opposed the motion, arguing first that the information was not relevant. The court quickly dismissed that argument, finding that "it is clear . . . that, in this case, where NuVasive seeks injunctive relief from Lanx's allegedly toritious efforts to hire NuVasive employees," the information and documents sought were reasonably calculated to lead to the discovery of admissible evidence.

Next, the defendant argued that the plaintiff's real purpose in requesting the names of the solicited employees was so that it could "coerce them into staying with NuVasive." Again the court was unpersuaded. It reiterated that the plaintiff sought to enjoin the defendant from its allegedly unlawful dealings with the plaintiff's employees. As a result, the court found, the plaintiff was entitled to discovery of the details of the defendant's contacts with those employees.

It is interesting to note that, based on this opinion, there does not appear to be an agreement not to solicit or other restrictive that would prevent Lanx from hiring NuVasive's employees. Parties and their lawyers tend to forget that contractual duties are not the only ones by which employees are bound. So, if you attempt to compete unfairly by unlawfully soliciting employees from your competitor, that competitor will have the right to discover who you called and who turned down your offer. Presumably, these individuals, having declined your offer of employment and electing, instead, to stay with their current employer, will make good witnesses for that employer, which you would want to avoid.

Denial. It may, as they say, be a river in Egypt, but that river doesn't run through the Delaware Court of Chancery.

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