DOT Regs vs. Lawful Marijuana Use

Medical-marijuana laws have been passed in several states. Although Delaware passed a law permitting medicinal use of marijuana, implementation was blunted by potential prosecution by the federal government. And, last month, Colorado and Washington voters made recreational use of marijuana legal in those states. Both medical- and recreational-marijuana-use laws raise lots of questions for employers.

One such question is how these laws will impact an employer’s ability to drug test employees and applicants. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requires drug testing for safety-sensitive positions. Applicants must be tested before beginning work. Current employees must be tested in certain circumstances, including following an accident. Marijuana is one of the drugs that must be included in the DOT-required screenings.

In 2009, in response to the passage of medical-marijuana laws in several states, the DOT clarified that marijuana remained unlawful under federal law. The DOT reiterated that medical use of marijuana was still “use” and was still considered a violation of the DOT’s regulations.

In response to the Colorado and Washington laws permitting recreational use of marijuana, the DOT has spoken yet again. On December 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Office of Drug and Alcohol Policy Compliance issued a Notice to address the recent passage of state initiatives purporting to legalize marijuana use for recreational purposes. Not surprisingly, the DOT’s position is unaffected by these State’s laws and the prohibition against marijuana use by anyone in a safety-sensitive position remains fully intact.

The conflict between state and federal drug laws will be resolved eventually. But, until then, the questions and contradictions will continue to cause confusion for employers.

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