10th Cir. Victory for Employer in Off-the-Clock Claim

Wage-and-hour lawsuits continue to plague employers around the country. Off-the-clock claims are some of the most difficult to defend because, by definition, the employee did not record the time in dispute. Trying to disprove an allegation is about as easy as boxing shadows.

Employers who face these off-the-clock claims are understandably frustrated by the ability of an employee to bring a lawsuit based on the employee’s failure to comply with workplace rules. A recent trend has been the application of an affirmative defense similar to the one used in harassment cases. This defense is a very positive development for employers.

A recent decision by the 10th Circuit applied a similar reasoning with a similarly positive result. In Brown v. ScriptPro, LLC, the plaintiff-employee claimed that he’d worked from home during a 4-month period so he could take time off before the birth of his child. Despite the company’s policy that required employees to record and submit time worked, the plaintiff claimed that he did not report the time. After he was fired for performance issues a few months later, he filed suit

The district court dismissed the suit, finding that the employee had failed to meet his burden to produce evidence of the overtime he claimed to have worked. He argued that the employer failed to keep the required time records. As a result, he argued, his burden to prove the amount of time worked should be lessened. The 10th Circuit disagreed.

Instead, the court found that the employee not only could have submitted the time he worked from home but, also, that he should have done so as required by the employer’s policy. Thus, the employee’s failure to record and report all time worked was fatal to his claim.

Brown v. ScriptPro, LLC, No. 11-3293 (10th Cir. Nov. 27, 2012).

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