Employer Can Depose All 94 Claimants In EEOC Lawsuit

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn November 24, 2012In: Discrimination, EEOC Suits & Settlements, Race (Title VII)

Email This Post | Print this Post

Litigating against the the EEOC is difficult for several reasons. For one, unlike a lawsuit brought by an individual plaintiff, a suit brought by the EEOC has the resources of the entire federal government behind it. Perhaps because of the agency's bureaucratic structure, negotiating with EEOC counsel can be difficult during litigation, at times resulting in a total breakdown of communication. A recent decision by a federal court in Illinois illustrates what happens when the lawyers in an employment-discrimination lawsuit take the driver's seat to the exclusion of the individuals at the heart of the case.

EEOC v. DHL Express (USA), Inc., was brought by the EEOC on behalf of 94 claimants, alleging that DHL discriminated against its African-American driver/dockworkers based on their race by giving them less desirable, more difficult, and more dangerous route and dock assignments than their Caucasian counterparts and by assigning African-American drivers to routes in predominately African-American areas.

DHL brought a motion to compel the EEOC to produce all of the claimants for deposition after the EEOC provided interrogatory responses that included an unsworn "vignette" for each claimant with the claimants' general allegations of discrimination. DHL argued that individual depositions were required because the vignettes were vague, filled with generalities, and, in several instances, inaccurate. DHL also argued that, because there is no standard as to what constitutes a "more dangerous assignment" and no objective criteria for what constitutes "less desirable," each claimant's individual testimony was necessary to establish its defense.

The court was not impressed by the "vignettes," finding that they failed to give any meaningful detail or specifics about the alleged discriminatory treatment. Instead, the court concluded that the additional 60 depositions (DHL had deposed 34 of the 94 claimants already), were necessary not to evaluate both potential liability and damages.

The lesson to be learned from this decision, in my opinion, relates mostly to litigation strategy. By submitting these "vignettes" in response to the defendant-employer's interrogatories, the EEOC seems to have forgotten about the individual employees whose claims were the basis for the lawsuit. Had the EEOC actually provided the sworn responses of the employees instead, the need for the employer to expend its resources to take an additional 60 depositions would not have been necessary. Or, perhaps, the EEOC should have formulated a clearer understanding of its allegations before filing its Complaint. Ah, a lawyer can dream, can't she?

EEOC v. DHL Express (USA), Inc., No. 10 C 6139 (N.D. Ill. Oct. 31, 2012).

Leave a comment