The State of the Social-Media Mess in Public Schools

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn October 7, 2012In: Public Sector, Social Media in the Workplace

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Teachers and social media. If you're in the business of writing news stories about poor judgment, this is the gift that just keeps giving. If, however, you're an educator, a school administrator, or a parent, this is a combination with potentially grave consequences. Here's yet another shocking example of a teacher who seemingly lost all perspective when she posted about her students on her Facebook page.
teachers social media

As reported by the N.Y. Post, here are a sampling of the comments, Patricia Dawson, a "highly-regarded English teacher" posted:

  • she described one of her 11th-grade classes as "suicide-inducing;"
  • she dreaded upcoming presentations by two students--who she named in the post--saying, "I will be quietly imploring anyone to end my life . . . and no one will be there to supply a gun;"
  • she described one of her students as the "WORST be (sic) he's unteachable and the weirdest human being EVER!"
  • she wrote, "I consider all immigrants as potential gun carriers;" and
  • she asked, "What bad can happen when young people invest in high-powered firearms? Nothing. . . . nothing at all."
Charming. Just charming.

As a quick aside, I'll just note that it seems that it's the high-school English teacher who makes the offensive Facebook comments about current students. (See, for example, these two prior posts: Blogging Teacher Returns to Work After Suspension for Posting About Students and N.Y. Teacher's Firing Overturned Despite Facebook Wish that Students Drown). Why is that?

Now, if you thought her comments were shocking, I've got a few more even more shocking facts for you to ponder.

First, the teacher was Facebook friends with several of her students. In my opinion, this is a per se bad idea. Teachers should not be Facebook friends with any student in their school who is not the teacher's child. Period. That's it. No discussion. To me, it demonstrates not only bad judgment on behalf of the teacher to be friends with these students but then to post about other students and think her posts wouldn't make it back to the kids she was talking about.

Second, the teacher also was Facebook friends with the President of the PTA. If the kids didn't report her, didn't she think that the PTA President would?

Third, and most disappointing, even if not the most shocking, this teacher was terminated after her online rant in January 2011. Her tenured status, though, meant she had the ability to appeal the decision, which, you may imagine, she did. The arbitrator who decided her appeal, concluded that the teacher "horribly abused her position of trust" with her "cruel andemeaning" Facebook posts. However he also found that she was a "dedicated teacher" and was "not irredeemable." He ordered her to pay a fine in the amount of $15,000 and take a course on "appropriate boundaries and relationships between teachers and students."

That was last June. The DOE, though, has not yet reinstated the teacher, although she remains on the payroll.

I don't know what the solution is to this problem. Suspending the teacher in this case seems necessary, doesn't it? If you were the parent of one of the students named in her online rant, would you be happy about her return? I wouldn't. I could imagine the disruption that her return would cause--if not an outright riot.

But, at the same time, who benefits by keeping her on the payroll and expending the district's already stretched-thin resources while she sits at home, educating no one? No one. If judges and arbitrators are going to let teachers who publicly exhibit "cruel and demeaning" behavior towards the students they teach return to the classroom, schools need to take a different tactical approach. It seems to me that training teachers before they exercise poor judgment is absolutely critical if schools stand a chance in preventing these stories from continuing to make headlines.

See also
Students, Teachers, and Social Media
No 1st Am. Protection for Teacher's Facebook Posts
Court Denies Reinstatement to Teacher Fired for Facebook Posts
Social-Media Woes for School Districts
More Social-Media Woes for School Districts

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