Social-Media Round Up (and other miscellany)

Discovery of Social-Media Evidence is the topic that I’ll be presenting today at the annual Office & Trial Practice seminar. Despite my far-reaching popularity (kidding, just kidding), the real celebrity at today’s event will be U.S. Supreme Court Justice Scalia. Because I probably should be practicing my presentation instead of writing a blog post today, I’ll try to keep this brief, adopting the weekly-round-up approach used by Jon Hyman.

In Jon’s honor, we’ll start the list with one of his posts from this week. Yesterday, Jon wrote about a case from the Central District of Illinois, in which the plaintiff claimed he had not been hired due to his age. The twist, though, was that the plaintiff claimed that his employer must have learned the plaintiff’s age by looking at his LinkedIn profile, which included the year he’d graduated from college. Before you run for the hills, bear in mind that the plaintiff was proceeding pro se, meaning without a lawyer. The allegations are weak, at best, but they were sufficient to survive a motion to dismiss. However, pro se plaintiffs are given a lot of leeway in their pleadings, so the ruling doesn’t surprise me too terribly much. The case is Nieman v. Grange Mut. Casualty Co., No. 11-3404 (C.D. Ill. Apr. 26, 2012).

Next up on the list is an update to a case I wrote about earlier this week, Acordia of Ohio, LLC v. Fishel. In that case, decided in May, the Ohio Supreme Court held that the surviving employer in a merger or sale could not enforce its predecessor’s employees’ noncompete agreements as if it had stepped into the predecessor’s shoes–unless the agreement expressly provided otherwise.

Kevin Griffith of Porter Wright’s Employer Law Report reported that, yesterday, the court reversed that part of its decision, finding that the successor entity may enforce such noncompete agreements, even though it was not the original contracting party. The court limited this holding, though, explaining that employees could challenge the validity of the agreement based on whether the merger(s) “created additional obligations or duties so that the agreements should not be enforced on their original terms.”

And, finally, Venkat Balasubramani writes about a new case from Texas, which seems to confirm what should be obvious–viewing comments posted to social-media sites cannot give rise to a claim for invasion of privacy. Why? Because, in short, sharing with one is, under traditional privacy concepts, sharing with all. Once you share information with anyone, you lose any reasonable expectation you may have had that the information will be kept private from others. Of course, there are a few, very limited exceptions, or “privileges,” such as attorney-client and doctor-patient situations, but none that would apply to Facebook posts.

And that, actually, brings me back to where I started. In the limited number of cases that have been decided on the question of discovery of social-networking information, comments, and other content, the courts have unanimously declined to find any type of social-media privilege or special privacy right. Although that does not mean that Facebook contents are there for the taking, either.

But more on that after I wow the crowd at today’s seminar. (Again, just kidding, really). Have a great weekend!

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