A Good Week for California's Pro-Labor Movement

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn October 1, 2012In: Legislative Update, Social Media in the Workplace, Union and Labor Issues

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Last week was a busy one at the Governor's office, where Governor Jerry Brown signed into law no less than three new laws with a pro-labor, pro-employee theme. The first two laws were a package deal, making California is the first State to enact legislation that prohibits employers and educators from requesting employees' and students' social-networking passwords. Gov. Brown announced that he'd signed the twin bills into law via a Twitter post on Thursday.
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California is the second State after Delaware to prohibit universities and colleges from requiring students to turn over their passwords to their social-networking accounts. It is the third State, following Maryland and Illinois, to enact similar legislation providing these privacy protections to employees and applicants. And similar legislation is pending in several States. New Jersey's version of the Facebook-privacy law was released by a Senate committee at the end of September.

The day after Gov. Brown signed the bills into law, he signed a third bill, which declared May to be Labor History Month. What, you ask, does this actually mean? Well, it means that school districts in the State will commemorate the month with educational exercises intended to teach students about the role of the labor movement in California and across the country.

The bill extends Labor History Week into a full month and moves the observation from the first week of April to the month of May. According to the Sacramento Bee, many of California's school districts are on spring break the first week of April, and supporters of the bill said the rest of the month is busy for students because they are preparing for statewide tests.

I think it's safe to say that last week was a good week for the pro-labor movement in California.

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