An HR Lesson from the Presidential Debate

I never discuss politics. Never. I don’t have the stomach for it, to be honest, and I avoid the subject like the plague. That said, I did manage to watch part of the Presidential Debate on Tuesday night. There are ample pundits who surely have more insightful (i.e., political) commentary than what I can offer. So I’ll gladly leave the politics to others and stick with what I know–employment law. Here’s one HR-related lesson that I took away from the debate.

One of the hottest topics of post- debate discussion was Mitt Romney’s comment about “binders full of women.” I’ll admit–when I heard him say that, I cringed. It just sounded so wrong.

But I’ll admit that I cringed for another reason. I assume Mr. Romney did not actually plan to say that he’d looked at “binders full of women.” Surely he meant to say that he’d reviewed binders full of resumes of female candidates. But, alas, those were not the words that he said. And now he’s stuck with the ones he did say.

And that’s the lesson for HR professionals. Be careful with your words–they’re hard to get rid of once they’ve been said and even more difficult to escape once they’ve been committed to paper.

I used to teach a seminar called, “Help Me Help You.” The theme of the seminar was effective documentation for supervisors and HR professionals. My slide deck consisted of real-life examples of documentation “done wrong.” One slide, for example, showed an excerpt of hand-written notes taken by a supervisor who later became the alleged wrongdoer in an age-discrimination case. He’d taken the notes during a pitch presentation by an outside vendor and had written, “would be good work for young project managers.”

What he meant, he explained at his deposition, was that the work offered good opportunities for junior project managers–not necessarily young ones. I have no doubt that his explanation was an honest one. But that didn’t make it any less uncomfortable when asked about it by the EEOC attorney who was deposing him.

There are more stories like this than I can possibly recount–although someday I may try if I ever getting around to writing my memoir of life as an employment lawyer. The point, though, is this: Words are cheap. Their consequences can be very, very costly. So choose wisely.

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