Litigators Love Depositions. Most Days, Anyway.

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn September 27, 2012In: Purely Legal

Email This Post | Print this Post

Litigators love depositions. Well, at least this litigator does. There's something about the challenge of navigating the subtle ebbs and flows of a personality you know only through the written word. But as much as I enjoy them, depositions are exhausting endeavors.

The mental jumping jacks are made all the more exhausting when the deponent is uncooperative or hostile. Of course we never expect the deponent to be particularly helpful but there is a middle ground. Nevertheless, when the plaintiff in an employment-discrimination suit refuses to cooperate, I have to wonder.

Specifically, I have to wonder about her counsel. Is he asleep at the wheel? Good plaintiffs' lawyers know that, at trial, their client is the one with the burden of proof.
Refusal to cooperate at deposition and a sudden "inability to recall" basic facts can be a major weapon in a defense lawyer's arsenal at trial. When a jury hears (or, if videotaped, sees) a plaintiff playing dumb at deposition, they are far less inclined to be sympathetic and much more likely to see her as a manipulating fraud. And that suits me just fine.

So, when I am deposing one of these "charming" individuals, I don't waste my time trying to beat answers out of her. If she doesn't want to testify honestly, so be it. I tend to let her write her own ticket to defeat. And, in jurisdictions like Delaware, where such conduct is sanctionable, I may be inclined to seek reimbursement of my fees. In the Third Circuit, a deponent who is so evasive that she prevents the questioner from eliciting appropriate testimony can be sanctioned by the court. And so can her lawyer if he sits silent, allowing his client to play games with opposing counsel.

So how about this deponent? In the video, below, the famous rapper, Lil' Wayne, is being deposed and, let's just say, he's not exactly playing along. He is the plaintiff, so the burden is his but the questions he is being asked are hardly relevant to the case. Am I horrified by his refusal to cooperate and his apparent inability to recall his criminal history? Frankly, I am not.

Parents, if you have big dreams about your son or daughter taking up the law for a living, I encourage you to watch the video and reconsider. Really, do you want your precious angel sitting across the table from Lil' Wayne and having to deal with that nonsense for a living? It takes a very particular kind of personality to handle, nevertheless feel some modicum of satisfaction from, a day at the office that goes like this.

And, because it's Friday, I'd like to share one more thing before signing off. For the litigators in the audience--both plaintiffs' and defense--I encourage you to read this post from the blog, Abnormal Use. The title of the post says it all, "The Most Unwritten Rule: Depositions Should Start at 10 a.m." If you are one of the lawyers who feel compelled to notice a deposition to begin any earlier than 10 a.m., I hope this post makes you reconsider the idea.

I recently had a case in which a lawyer on the other side took no less than 10 depositions, almost all of them at his office, which was located more than 2 hours from mine. Despite knowing that the witnesses and counsel had to drive such a far distance, he insisted on beginning at 9 or 9:30 a.m. I managed it but still harbor some resentment about it. He will not be on my holiday-card list this year.

Leave a comment