Gordon Ramsay, A Hotel, and a Hen House

Last night I watched the second episode of Gordon Ramsay’s new show, Hotel Hell. If you’re not familiar with the show, the basic premise is this: Gordon visits a failing hotel and, after lots of screaming and yelling, turns the owners into decent human beings who don’t treat their staff like savages and who see the error in their ways. The team all pulls together at the end and turns the place around. [FN 1]

Like the premiere episode last week, last night’s episode provided no shortage of “teaching moments.” [FN 2] The main lesson from last night’s show was this: leave the farming to the farmers. Just because you have enough change in your pocket to buy a parcel of land does not mean that you should be operating a John Deere. The chickens will cluck at you from the hen house and the cows are likely to give you a swift kick with a hoof if you so much as think trying to milk one of them. Blue Hen of Delaware.jpg

In this case, there was no farm, no tractor, and no animals. It was worse–there was a lawyer with a hotel. A lawyer who had no experience whatsoever in the hospitality industry. But, one starry night, he was talking to his wife about what they should do to celebrate their wedding anniversary when he had the bright idea to buy the local landmark hotel instead of, let’s say, just booking a dinner reservation.

And, poof, just like that, the lawyer became a hotelier. Not a successful hotelier, mind you. But a hotelier nonetheless. Soon, Gordon was on site to save the day.

He nearly fell over when he learned that Mr. and Mrs. Hotel Owners had no experience in any aspect of hotel or restaurant management. He told them, or, technically, screamed at them, that they ought to just sell the place; that they were not cut out for this business. As it turns out, it seems that Gordon may have been right, the post-script following the show indicated that the bank foreclosed on the property, despite Gordon’s valiant efforts. So what’s the “teaching moment” from this low-grade disaster?

Don’t pretend to be something that you’re not.

If you find yourself responsible for a project in a subject matter far beyond your scope of knowledge, admit it. And, for the love of Ramsay, don’t try to boss around the real subject-matter experts. If you do, you’ll be the laughing stock of the hen house. [FN 3]


[FN1] Don’t misread my description as a negative review–I heart Gordon Ramsay. If it’s his show, it’s great, and that’s that.

[FN 2] A “teaching moment,” for those who many not know, is a major screw-up that, 15 years ago, would have resulted in taunting and teasing but, today, prompts insightful discussion by those who did not cause said screw-up.

[FN 3] In Delaware, you’d have Blue Hens in your proverbial hen house, as it’s the Delaware State Bird.

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