I Admit It, I Am a Sucker for a Compliment . . . Sort of

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn July 12, 2012In: Employee Engagement

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Everyone likes a compliment. Believe me when I say that I am no exception. In fact, I've been accused on more than one occasion of being a real sucker for a compliment. A guaranteed way to win me over is to compliment this blog. Works like a charm just about every time.

There's a difference, though, in appreciating when others take notice of your work and working in the hopes that others take notice. I would write the blog, subject to the approval of my employer, of course, regardless of whether anyone ever complimented it. There are so many benefits to blogging that any compliments or recognition that I may get is, truly, a bonus.

If you're wondering, I write the blog because it's a tremendous service to my clients; because it keeps me up-to-the-minute current in my practice area; because it's wonderful to make connections with other e-law bloggers; because it serves as a research repository for me and my colleagues; and because it's a great creative outlet. These are just some of the many reasons that I devote time every day to read other blogs and to write interesting posts that our readers will find valuable. It is, indeed, a labor of love. And that is why the occasional complimentary word about the fruits of my labor mean so much to me. But, again, the kind word or recognition is not the reason, it's just one of the results.

Which leads me to the actual topic of this post. Yesterday, HR Examiner released its list of the Top 25 Employment Law Online Influencers. Apparently, I didn't make the list. Truth be told, I would never have known about the list--or the fact that I'm not on it--but for Twitter and, more specifically, Dan Schwartz. On my walk home from work last night, I was skimming my Twitter feeds and saw a whole flurry of posts that mentioned me.

As it turns out, Dan, who writes the award-winning Connecticut Employer's Law Blog, is on the list, as are a few other employment lawyers. Dan thanked the authors of the list and was kind enough to note that he felt the list was incomplete without me and our friend, Jon Hyman, of the Ohio Employer's Law Blog. This, of course, was totally gratuitous on Dan's part and an all-around super nice gesture.

Following a lengthy Twitter exchange about who should and should not be included on the list, Dan decided to simply make his own list--an excellent idea, indeed--and did so in a post today. Jon and I both made Dan's list, I'm proud to say.

But here's the more important story. Although it can be easier said than done, we should try to remember that it's not the recognition that motivates us. If we love what we do--and I do--then the work motivates us. The rest of it is great when it happens; and it's perfectly fine when it doesn't. We can't be named to every list or win every award, nor should we try. Lucky for me, I am the recipient of far more kind words than I deserve. It's my job to make sure I pass it forward and continue to at least try to earn the compliments that I am given.

Thanks, Dan. And thanks to all of our loyal readers! Now, go check out Dan's list and the 9 other bloggers who made the cut. Then say something nice to someone who is trying hard to get it right.

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