Employers, Are Your Employees Minding Their Own Business?

Employees send a lot of emails at work. Goodness knows, the emails in my inbox never seems to stop piling up. And I think we can all agree that emails we send at work aren’t always work related. So what do we talk about when our emails are not strictly business?

A pair of Georgia Tech researchers have published their take on the answer–but you may not want to know what they found. According to Tanu Mitra and Eric Gilbert, in their paper, “Have You Heard? How Gossip Flows Through Workplace Email” (PDF), found that more than 1 in every 7 emails sent at work contains workplace gossip.

The study evaluated more than 500,000 emails sent by Enron employees and looked for The authors define email “gossip” as an email in which an employee is mentioned in the body of the text but not included as a recipient. The study has lots of juicy findings:

1. Who Engages In Email Gossip?
Workplace gossip is common at all levels of the organizational hierarchy. [No big shock here.] Employees are most likely to gossip with their peers and employees at the bottom of the corporate hierarchy are responsible for a large portion of email gossip.

2. What Types of Emails Include Gossip?
The study concludes that gossip appeared as often in personal exchanges as it did in formal business communications. Emails that are targeted to a smaller audience are more likely to contain gossip.

3. How Gossip-y is the Gossip?
Negative gossip appeared in emails 2.7 times more often than positive gossip. At the risk of stating the obvious, this is not a good finding for employers. If true, it would mean that, not only are employees wasting lots of time with gossiping emails but that they’re probably doing some real harm to workplace morale. Employers, how much are you spending to pay employees to stir the pot? Nobody likes a pot stirrer.

4. And, a random but fascinating finding:
Mid-level in-house lawyers contribute the second-highest amount of downward-flowing gossip. Yikes! I won’t even attempt to rationalize this finding. I’d say that I will take a harder look at my own practices but I never send non-work-related emails during working time. [Particularly when my boss may be reading this post!]

It’s a fascinating subject matter and an equally fascinating paper.
[H/T Workplace Diva]

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