Don't Hate Me Because I'm Beautiful

Posted by Molly DiBiancaOn June 4, 2012In: Discrimination, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), Gender (Title VII), Hiring

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Sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll. Employment law can involve any or all three. Which explains why it takes a certain personality to really love this gig. Lately, though, I've seen a bevy of employment-law stories involving claims based on or involving beautiful people.

Last week, for example, I reported on yet another story involving a woman who claims she was fired from her data-entry job in a lingerie warehouse for being too sexy. [Ed. Note: This story, which involves a woman alleging she was too sexy for her job in a lingerie warehouse owned by Orthodox Jews, should clear up any doubt about why I love my job.] This wasn't the first story of this kind, though. I've reported about at least two similar claims in the past couple of years. And I recently reported about a gender-discrimination claim based on the plaintiff's part-time job as a dancer.

Michael Schmidt of the Social Media Employment Law Blog reports a different type of case involving exotic dancers. [Ed. Note: Michael's post is overflowing with hilarity in the form of well-crafted double entendres. For a great read, be sure to jump over to his original post, Slowly Stripping Away Privacy Rights. Brava, Michael!] In In re Penthouse Executive Club Compensation Litigation, No. 10-cv-1145 (KMV) (S.D.N.Y. May 10, 2012), the employer-defendant sought to compel one of the plaintiffs, an "entertainer in the Penthouse Executive Club," to produce nine pages of Facebook messages that she'd exchanged with other plaintiffs and with non-parties about others joining the FLSA suit.

The judge considered the motion in the same way any similar motion would be considered. She found that the Facebook messages sent to non-parties were "prepared in anticipation of litigation" and, as such, were protected by the work-product doctrine because they were "descriptions of conversations with Plaintiffs' counsel regarding litigation strategy, as well as responses to questions about the lawsuit." On the other hand, Facebook messages sent by non-parties to the plaintiff were not subject to the same protections and had to be produced.

And here's a twist on the theme. Instead of claims brought by beautiful people, here's a story brought against beautiful people. The owner of Marylou's, a coffee shop in Rhode Island known for employing beautiful baristas donned in pink shirt, is speaking out against the EEOC. The coffee shop has been under investigation for more than a year by the federal agency, which claims to be investigating the business' hiring practices. There has not been a complaint of discrimination, though, and many members of the community are outraged at the expenditure of federal funds and the cost imposed on the business in the absence of any actual charge of wrongdoing.

Maybe the EEOC is just trying to balance out all of those don't-hate-me-because-I'm-beautiful claims.

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