E-Law Mid-Week Recap

It’s only Wednesday but this has been a busy week already. If time allowed, I could write posts on several important employment-law-related topics. But, alas, my day job is keeping me busy, so this short-form recap of some of the more notable items will have to suffice.

Delaware’s Pending Password-Privacy Legislation

As I’ve written recently, there is a bill pending in Delaware’s House of Representatives that is intended to prohibit employers from requesting or requiring that an employee or applicant turn over his or her password. If you’ve read my posts on this topic, you know that I have significant concerns about the scope of the bill and its potential consequences for both employers and employees. This afternoon, the bill will be presented for vote to the Telecommunications, Internet, and Technology Committee.  I will keep you posted about the results of that hearing as soon as possible. Until then, you should consider reaching out to your State Representative and voice any concern you may have with the bill.

Pretexting Via Social Media

I wrote earlier this week about a high-school principal in Missouri, who is alleged to have created a fake Facebook account for the purpose of spying on students in her school. As I stated in that post, using deceit about your identity for the purpose of obtaining information about someone, known as pretexting, is a wholly unacceptable practice.

On her Ride the Lightning blog, Sharon Nelson writes of a story with similarly disturbing facts.  In the case that she discusses, an insurer in a dog-bite case permitted its private investigator to lie about his identity on Facebook so he could spy on the plaintiff-a 12-year-old girl.  Folks, if it’s not obvious already, this type of dishonesty is despicable and those who engage in it should not be surprised at the negative repercussions that result. 

Show Me the Numbers

The EEOC has released a new set of statistics relating to Charges of Discrimination filed in FY 2011.  What is notable about this data is that it marks the first time the EEOC has published private-sector statistics for each of the states and territories.  The statistics provide the total number of charges filed in each state and a breakdown of charge by type of discrimination.  This is the first time that state-specific information has been released and it offers helpful insight on a more granular level.

Lots of blawgers have reviewed this data as it relates to their particular states. For example, Dan Schwartz wrote about the Connecticut numbers and McAfee & Taft’s EmployerLINC blog posted about the Oklahoma stats.  And Chris DeGroff and Matthew Gagnon, of Seyfarth Shaw’s Workplace Class Action blog wrote about the significance of this data.

Another One Bites the Dust

Because I just never seem to grow weary of stories involving smart people who fail to exercise good judgment when using social media, I’ll toss this one to my loyal readers for good measure.  In this social-media saga, it’s a CFO who was terminated for improperly communicating company information through his Twitter feed and public Facebook profile. Jon Hyman and Phil Miles recap the story in more detail.

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