Pretexting via Facebook Is Still Pretexting

Does Facebook cause smart people to act dumb? Stories of poor judgment via Facebook continue to make the news and continue to amaze me. But there seems to be no end in sight to the incidents of social-media stupidity. A recent story from Missouri may qualify for this category.

A high-school principal in Clayton, Missouri, is alleged to have created a fake Facebook account under the name “Suzy Harriston,” reports the NY Daily News. Before you know it, she had more than 300 friends–many of whom were students at the high-school. A former quarterback outed her, posting her real identity on his Facebook page. The Suzy Harriston account disappeared and, the next day, the school announced that the principal was taking a leave of absence.

The principal resigned following a closed-session meeting of the school board. The school board stated that the district and the principal had “a fundamental dispute concerning the appropriate use of social media.”

So, friends, what is the lesson to be learned here? Dishonesty is unacceptable. And dishonesty by a person in a position of trust and leadership is deeply troubling. It is, despite this principal’s apparent belief, dishonest to pretend you are someone you are not for the purposes of obtaining information about another. It’s called pretexting.

Don’t engage in pretexting. Don’t be dishonest. And don’t endorse dishonest conduct by your employees or by your leaders. The rules are the same, even if the medium has changed.

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