(FMLA) Form Over Function

New FMLA forms appear to be around the corner. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Labor issued a set of forms, which were intended to assist employers in reviewing and granting requests for leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Updated forms have been submitted to the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), but have not yet been approved.

Until new forms are issued, the U.S. DOL has indicated that the old forms may continue to be used. However, employers should note that the 2008 forms do not account for recent changes in the law. The most significant change since the forms were issued is the publication of regulations implementing the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). The GINA regulations were issued in 2010 and took effect in January 2011.

GINA generally prohibits employers from obtaining employees’ genetic information, except in limited circumstances. Because of the broad scope of GINA’s prohibition, many employers were concerned about its impact on their businesses. The regulations issued in 2010 addressed many of these concerns, and created an exception where employers inadvertently obtain an employee’s genetic information. In order to take advantage of this exception, employers are advised to include “safe-harbor” language in medical forms, including FMLA documentation. We’ve addressed the FMLA-GINA safe-harbor issue and provided sample language in previous posts. The 2008 FMLA forms issued do not contain this safe-harbor language, so employers should consider adding it as a temporary solution until new forms are approved.

Contact Information