GINA’s Impact on Employers: Pink Ribbons and Yellow Bracelets

In today’s culture of pink ribbons, yellow bracelets, and fundraising walks, it is not hard to imagine the multitude of ways an employer might learn about the genetic test or manifestation of a disease by a family member. Loved ones often become involved with organizations specific to the disease of their family member, and even sometimpink ribbones starting their own. The employee’s membership in or leadership role in such organizations might well be reflected on their resume or application. Such relationship is likely to be disclosed on an employee’s Facebook, Twitter, or MySpace page. A quick Google search on an application, now typically performed in the most rudimentary background check, would reveal this information.

As noted in Parts 1 and 2 of this series, GINA’s inclusion of a “manifested disease” of a family member does not limit diseases to those with a genetic component. Therefore, an adult employee caring for a parent with lung cancer (which is generally accepted to be caused by environmental, not genetic influences), would be covered by GINA if he could show that his employer knew about the manifested disease of his parent, and treated him differently as a result. So would a parent with a child recently diagnosed with leukemia.

Health care coverage for a dependent in the face of a crippling diagnosis for a child is understandably, among the top concerns for any employee faced with this situation. There is a tremendous amount of fear in losing that coverage and an employer’s response to the knowledge that the employee may cause the employer to incur hundreds of thousands of dollars in healthcare costs. For an employee who is terminated in close proximity to a child’s diagnosis, one can easily appreciate the conclusion such employee may draw about the cause of the termination.

Bottom Line

GINA is likely to be a valuable add-on to existing statutes applicable in caregiving situations. These scenarios present highly sympathetic plaintiffs, and juries ready to find employers culpable of economic incentives. GINA may just be the hook many caregivers need to grab onto a claim, and its reach in this regard should not be underestimated.

 

Parts 1 and 2 in the series:

The GINA’s Out of the Bottle–And It’s a New Weapon in the Work-Family Arsenal

GINA’s Application to Caregiver Scenarios

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