The Top 30 Blogs on Writing

Better writing is a worthy goal for anyone.  And certainly for lawyers, who make a living by being persuasive.  I work on my writing skills year round but, for the purposes of this series of posts, I’m calling this goal a resolution.  In the spirit of resolutions, I posted on 10 of the Funniest Writing Blogs.  (If you missed that post, go check it out–you’re guaranteed a laugh from the very particular bloggers who feel so passionately about things like the overuse of quotation marks.)

In the second post in the series, I offered readers a list of 20 Online Dictionaries, which included everything from the Dictionary of Philly Slang (our native language), to the RhymeZone, to the Dictionary of Sushi.  You can never have too many reference sources, right?

Today, in the third post in the series, I’m being a bit more serious and scholarly.  Below are 30 of the Best Writing Blogs.  Some of the blogs focus on legal writing, some are strictly business (writing, that is), and some are whatever they want to be on any given day.  Here’s to better writing everywhere!

Adams Drafting, by Ken Adams, concentrates exclusively on contract drafting and writing issues facing transactional lawyers.
Bad Language is a U.K. blog by Matthew Stibbe.  The blog is dedicated to business marketing, which Stibbe (rightly) believes is linked to effective writing.
Building Rapport, The Plain Language Blog, is written by Canadian Cheryl Stephens. The blog’s mantra sums up Stephens’ philosophy quite well.  The purpose of the blog is to “advocat[e] plain language, clear design, sensitivity to audience concerns, and civility.”
Business Writing, by Lynn Gaertner-Johnston, offers helpful and gracious instruction on writing in the business world.  Lynne’s posts often derive from questions she’s received in one of her writing seminars, which ensures the timeliness of the topic.
Confident Writing, by writing coach Joanna Young, offers words of encouragement, as well as words of instruction, to a broad audience, including writers and writing hopefuls.
Copyblogger by Brian Clark is targeted towards those who want to improve their online presence through effective blogging.
Daily Writing Tips is maintained by five talented professional writers and offers just what it promises–daily tips on how to improve your writing. If you’re feeling confident, take one of the several “tests” offered at the site to measure your vocabulary, grammar, and spelling skills. 
Disputed Issues, by Stephen R. Diamond, J.D., Ph.D., tackles common missteps in legal writing, as well as the reasons why lawyers write so badly.
Fairyland Castle is a new blog written by recent law-school graduate, Martin Magnusson, who provides commentary–not instruction–on legal writing.
Grammar Girl Mignon Fogarty offers short, friendly tips to improve your writing. Covering the grammar rules and word choice guidelines, Grammar Girl makes complex grammar questions simple with memory tricks to help you recall and apply those troublesome grammar rules. Grammar Girl is also available via podcast, if you want to make that morning commute count for something.
Grammarphobia Blog is the love-child of Patricia T. O’Conner and Stewart Kellerman, who met as editors at the New York Times. They offer practical advice for handling every type of grammar problem.
Legal Writing Prof Blog offers resources and news updates by legal-writing academics., by Wayne Scheiss, who also maintains an excellent website.
Manage Your Writing, by Dr. Ken Davis, former chair of English at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.  This site offers readers short, to-the-point posts on discrete ways to “manage” your writing.  It also offers a great list of writing resources.
Men with Pens is a Canadian blog by three, you guessed it, men with pens, who post regularly on ways to improve your writing, blogging, web design, and business generally, in an edgy and irreverent way that’s proven very popular with readers. [Update Jan. 16, 2010: According to Mister Thorne, this blog is not written by three men with pens but by one woman. How delightful!]
Mr. Rewrite is a sassy blog that looks at “spelling, grammar, and usage with a dash of humor.”
Party of the First Part, by Adam Freedman, is devoted to eradicating the world of the pompous and verbose writing style commonly referred to as “Legalese.” At the website of the same name, you can get your kicks by laughing at people who write worse than you at the Legalese Hall of Shame, where “POFP points the Fickle Finger of Fate at some real-life gobbledygook — from insurance contracts, jury instructions, and other literary gems (with translations).”
Robust Writing, by freelance writer Jesse Hines, encourages readers to use writing as a persuasive tool for success in business, marketing, and life in general.
Set In Style, by Mister Thorne, the “Legal Wordsmith.”** One of my favorite writing blogs, this site is directed to the legal profession but is beneficial for anyone whose writing is intended to serve as marketing material.
Style & Substance is one of the many great blogs of the Wall Street Journal. Maintained by
Paul R. Martin, editor of the WSJ’s stylebook, the blog is host to monthly bulletins about style (and the lack thereof) in contemporary language.
The (New) Legal Writer, by Ray Ward, an appellate lawyer practicing in Louisiana, is very popular with those in the know around the blogosphere. 
The Slot is written by Bill Walsh, author of Lapsing Into a Comma and The Elephants of Style. Walsh also maintains the website, The Slot, which provides regular commentary targeted to copy editors and interesting enough for anyone with a passion for writing.
The Vocabula Review “battles nonstandard, careless English and embraces clear, expressive English.” In short, this blog is dense with solid content that offers valuable instruction to writers at every skill level.
The Word Blog, by Boston Globe columnist Jan Freeman, is a blog about “the rules and realities of the English language.”  
Triangle Grammar Guide is a blog hosted by North Carolina’s News & Observer journalist, Pam Nelson. The posts are short and witty and propose to be your “online grammar class.”
Word Wise is written by Dan Santow, VP at Edelman, which, according to Dan, is the world’s largest privately held PR firm. Satow’s posts are inspired by everyday observations of language done well and not so well.
Write to Done is authored by blogger extraordinaire, Leo Babauta. His twice-weekly posts cover “the art and craft of writing.” If Leo Babauta blogs it, you can bet it’s worth reading it.
Writing, Clear and Simple, by Roy Jacobsen, offers writing tips to legal and non-legal writing alike.
Writing Tools by Poynter Online is the online home of The Poynter Institute, a school for “journalists, future journalists, and teachers of journalists” located in St. Petersburg, Florida.  Poynter maintains one of the very best online resources for everything related to writing.
You Don’t Say: Language & Usage is a Baltimore Sun blog, written by John McIntyre. McIntyre’s bio, as stated on the blog, says it far better than I possibly could: “John McIntyre, a mild-mannered copy editor for a great metropolitan newspaper, has fussed over writers’ work at The Baltimore Sun since 1986.”


The other posts in this series on Writing:

Writing References #2: 20 Online Dictionaries

Writing Reference #1: 10 Humorous Writing Blogs

My Finely Tailored New Year’s Resolution: Pens & Pinstripes

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