Searching MySpace and Facebook for Job Applicants and . . . Judges?

Employers who use MySpace and Facebook as hiring tools have been the subject of some debate.  Employers have used MySpace to screen potential job candidates.  Employers have fired employees for something posted on the employee’s Facebook and MySpace pages.  Even the incoming White House administration is requiring applicants to disclose any potentially embarrassing content on social networking sites.  Recently, there was some discussion about the use of social networking sites as a way to defend an employer in an employment litigation lawsuit. judge in robes with gavel

And now, there’s talk of yet another purpose for the use of online profiles.  In the Fall issue of Litigation News, a quarterly magazine published by the ABA’s Litigation Section, an article entitled Know Thy Judge advocates conducting an internet search on the judge assigned to your case.  Specifically, the article suggests that counsel should “Google the judge” before appearing in his or her courtroom, in the hopes of gaining insight on the judge’s personality, habits, or tendencies. 

I wouldn’t expect that many judges maintain public Facebook or MySpace pages.  But, in twenty years, when the bench is filled with Gen Ys wearing black robes, will their “internet past” play a relevant and important role?  It seems inevitable, doesn’t it?  Especially in light of the recent report that the number of adults using online networking tools has quadrupled in the past three years. 


One response to “Searching MySpace and Facebook for Job Applicants and . . . Judges?”

  1. And social networking now has become so much more than just myspace and facebook. It seems like there are a handful of social networks for every profession, not to mention age group and demographic. A google search can result in any number of things about someone. You have to watch what gets posted about you pretty closely.

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