Telecommuting Is a Way to Work More–Not to Drive Less

Alternative schedules, such as “4/10s” (a/k/a four-day workweeks), have been hot topics for the past several months.  I know I’ve put more than my two cents worth of commentary out there recently.  So why is it that only a tiny percentage of the country’s employees report having access to such flex-time initiatives?  j0400948

In a recent Gallup Poll, only 12% of workers say that their employers encouraged its employees to work from home one or more workdays per week.  And only 16% say that the idea of the 4-day workweek has been supported by management.  Yes, these are increases from alternative schedules reported in the past but they can hardly be considered to be representative of the general population. 

What hasn’t increased, though, is telecommuting.  There has been 0% increase in the number of respondents who say they telecommute at all.  Well, no, that’s inaccurate–that number has actually fallen 2%, down to 30% today as compared to 32% in 2006. 

What I found most important was the finding that employees who reported that they have telecommuted say that they do so as a way to put in extra hours on nights or on weekends.  Telecommuting, it seems, has no correlation to a reduced cost of driving. 

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